Course Syllabus

Course Syllabus

Course Syllabus

Program Core, Basic Science, Mathematics and Elective Courses 

EEE 1101: Electrical Circuits I

Theory, 3 Credit Hours

Pre-requisite: N/A

Course Objective:

This is a foundation course for the undergraduate students of electrical, electronic and telecommunications engineering. In electrical and electronic engineering almost every device/system is modeled through electrical circuit and the device/system performances are then predicted for either DC or AC excitation. To model any electrical or electronic device or systems, the knowledge of electrical circuit and circuit performance under DC excitation is a must. Thus, students should have crystal clear idea about the network theorems and network solution methods. The objective of this course is to teach the students the fundamentals of electrical circuit solution techniques, network theorems and transient analysis of R-L and R-C circuits under DC excitations.

Course Contents:

Basic Concepts: Charge and Current, Voltage, Power and Energy, Circuit Elements, Applications; Concept of series and parallel circuit; Basic Laws: Ohm’s Law, KCL, KVL; Voltage Division and Current Division rules. Equivalent resistance calculation, Wye-Delta Transformations, Applications; Methods of analysis: Nodal analysis, Mesh analysis, Applications; Circuit Theorems: Linearity Property, Superposition, Source Transformation, Thevenin’s Theorem, Norton’s Theorem, Maximum Power Transfer Theorem; Capacitors and Inductors: Capacitors, Series and Parallel Capacitors, Inductors, Series and Parallel Inductors; First Order Circuits: The source free RC circuit, The source free RL circuit, Singularity Functions, Step Response of RC Circuit, Step Response of RL circuit.

Course Outcomes:

After successfully completion of this course students will be able to:

CO Description Bloom’s Taxonomy Domain / Level Assessment Tools
CO1 Understand the concepts of potential difference, current, power and energy in electrical circuits. Cognitive / L2 Mid-term, Final Exam, Assignment
CO2 Solve any linear electrical network applying mesh current method and nodal analysis. Cognitive / L3 Mid-term, Final Exam, Assignment
CO3 Solve electrical DC circuits applying network theorems. Cognitive / L2 Mid-term, Final Exam, Assignment
CO4 Understand the transient response in RC, RL and RLC circuits. Cognitive / L2 Mid-term, Final Exam, Assignment

Mapping of COs to POs:

CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 X X                    
CO2   X                    
CO3   X                    
CO4   X                    

Recommended Textbook: 

  1. Fundamentals of Electric Circuits – Charles K Alexander and Mathew N O Sadiku (4th Ed)

Reference Book:

  1. Basic Electric Circuit Analysis – David E. Johnson, John L. Hilburn, Johnny R. Johnson, and Peter D. Scott (5th Ed).
  2. Electric Circuits’ – James W. Nilsson and Susan A. Riedel (8th Ed)
  3. Introductory Circuit Analysis – Robert L.

EEE 1102: Electrical Circuits I Lab

Lab: 1 Credit Hour

Course Objective:

The objective of this course is to verify the circuit theories and concepts taught in EEE 101. The students will carry out lab experiments. They will gain exposure to equipment and learn experimental methods. The students will analyze their results and come to meaningful conclusions within their understanding, being mindful of the errors and uncertainties in their measurements.

List of Experiments:

Exp. No. Experiment Name
1

Simulation of basic electrical DC circuits using PSPICE

2

Verification of KVL & Voltage Divider Rule

3 Verification of KCL & Current Divider Rule
4 Verification of Superposition Principle
5 Verification of Thevenin’s and Norton’s Theorems
6 Verification of Maximum Power Transfer Theorem
7 Study of Transient Behavior of RC Circuit
8 Study of Transient Behavior of RL Circuit
9 Study of Transient Behavior of RLC Circuit

Course Outcomes (COs):

After successfully completion of this course students will be able to:

CO Description Bloom’s Taxonomy Domain/Level Assessment Tools
CO1 Measure and simulate DC circuit parameters using experimental and simulation tools Psychomotor / L1 Lab Exam
CO2 Write comprehensive reports on the work done in laboratory and/or in a group project, and orally present the project results Cognitive / L2 Report writing

Mapping of COs to POs:

CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1       X X              
CO2                 X X    

EEE 1203: Electrical Circuits II

Theory: 3 Credit Hours

Pre-requisite: EEE 101

Course Objective:

The objective of this course is to introduce the fundamental knowledge for AC circuit analysis. The students will be able to solve AC circuits using network theorems and different analysis techniques. This course aims to introduce the concepts of three-phase systems, magnetically coupled circuits and resonant circuits. The students will achieve adequate knowledge to analyze and extract different parameters from these circuits.

Course Contents:

Definitions of AC voltage, current, power, volt-ampere and various factors including the peak and form factors. Introduction to sinusoidal steady state analysis: Sinusoidal sources, instantaneous and effective voltage and currents, average power, phasors and complex quantities, impedance, real and reactive power, maximum power transfer, power factor and its improvement. Analysis of single-phase AC circuits: Series and parallel RL, RC and RLC circuits, nodal and mesh analysis, application of network theorems in AC circuits, circuits with non-sinusoidal excitations, transients in AC circuits. Analysis of three phase circuits: three phase supply, balanced and unbalanced circuits, power calculation. Passive filters: Basic types. characteristic impedance and attenuation, practical composite filters. Resonance in AC circuits: Series and parallel resonance. Magnetically coupled circuits.

Course Outcomes:

After successfully completion of this course students will be able to:

CO Description Bloom’s Taxonomy Domain/Level Assessment Tools
CO1 Understand the basic of sinusoids and phasor algebra; and solve AC circuits in phasor domain using techniques such as nodal analysis, mesh analysis and network theorems. Cognitive / L2 Mid-term, Final Exam, Assignment
CO2 Calculate RMS value, complex power, real power, reactive power and power factor in AC circuits. Cognitive / L3 Mid-term, Final Exam, Assignment
CO3 Solve three-phase balanced and unbalanced circuits in phasor domain. Cognitive / L3 Mid-term, Final Exam, Assignment
CO4 Solve magnetically coupled circuits and electrical resonant circuits. Cognitive / L3 Mid-term, Final Exam, Assignment

Mapping of COs to POs:

CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 X X                    
CO2   X                    
CO3   X                    
CO4   X                    

 

Recommended Textbook: 

  1. “Fundamental of Electric Circuits” by Charles K Alexander and Mathew N O Sadiku, Tata, McGraw Hill.
  2. Introductory Circuit Analysis – Robert L. Boylestad

Reference Book:

  1. “Electric Circuits” by James W. Nilsson and Susan Riedel.
  2. Alternating-Current Circuits – George F.  Kerchner, Russell M. Corcoran

EEE 1204: Electrical Circuits II Lab

Lab: 1 Credit Hour

Course Objective:

The objective of this course is to verify the theories and concepts taught in EEE 103. The students will carry out lab experiments and/or will perform simulation. They will gain exposure to equipment and simulation tools in laboratories and learn experimental methods. The students will analyze their results and come to meaningful conclusions within their understanding, being mindful of the errors and uncertainties in their measurements.

 

List of Experiments:

Exp. No. Experiment Name
1 Simulation of basic electrical AC circuits using PSPICE
2 Current Measurement of Lamp Loads Using SPST Switches
3 Determination of circuit parameters of an RLC series circuit and verification with actual value.
4 Determination of circuit parameters of an RLC parallel circuit and verification with actual value.
5 AC power measurement and power factor calculation using AC Wattmeter, Ammeter and Voltmeter.
6 Study of Series Resonance and Verification using PSPICE Simulation
7 Study of Frequency Responses of RL / RC Filters
8 Determination of Phase Sequence of Three Phase Supply
9 Measurement of Three-Phase Power by Two Wattmeter Method

Course Outcomes (COs):

After successfully completion of this course students will be able to:

CO Description Bloom’s Taxonomy Domain / Level Assessment Tools
CO1 Measure and simulate AC circuit parameters using experimental and simulation tools Psychomotor / L1 Lab Performance and Lab Final Exam
CO2 Write comprehensive reports on the work done in laboratory and/or in a group project, and orally present the project results Cognitive / L2 Lab Report/ Project Report

Mapping of COs to POs:

CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1       X X              
CO2                 X X    

CSE 1203: Structured Programming

Theory: 3 Credit Hours

Pre-requisite: N/A

Course Objective:

The objectives of this course are to introduce students with the computer programming language, and teach them the syntax, array, structure data types, pointer variables, functions and file processing in C programming.

Course Contents:

Introduction to the course and description of course outline, Getting started, Introduction to C, Data types, Keywords, Variables, Operators and Expressions, Decision Making and Control flow: If, else if, switch statements, Loops: For loop, Nesting of for loop, While loop, Do-while loop, Array: One dimensional, Two-dimensional array, sorting algorithms, Functions: Scope rules of function, Nesting and recursion of function, Call by value and call by reference, Passing array elements to a function, String operation: String variables, String I/O operations, Standard library string functions, Array of pointers to string, Structure: Structure type, structure elements, Array structures, Structure I/O in C, Dynamic memory allocation, File Management.

Course Outcomes:

After successfully completion of this course students will be able to:

CO Description Bloom’s Taxonomy Domain / Level Assessment Tools
CO1 Remember the basic structure of C programming, declaration and usage of variables. Cognitive / L1 Mid-term, Final Exam, Assignment
CO2 Understand the appropriate decision making and looping statements while writing programs in C. Cognitive / L2 Mid-term, Final Exam, Assignment
CO3 Apply arrays and functions to solve computational problems. Cognitive / L3 Mid-term, Final Exam, Assignment
CO4 Apply appropriate data structures like pointers, structures and user defined functions to solve computational real-life problems. Cognitive / L3 Mid-term, Final Exam, Assignment

 

Mapping of COs to POs:

COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 X                      
CO2 X X                    
CO3   X                    
CO4   X                    

Textbook: 

Programming in ANSI C – Balagurusamy. 7th Edition

Reference Book:

  1. Teach Yourself C – Herbert Schildt.
  2. C: The Complete Reference, 4th Ed. – Herbert Schildt.

CSE 1204: Structured Programing Lab

Lab: 1 Credit Hour

Course Objective:

The objective of this course is to verify the circuit theories and concepts taught in CSE 103. Main objective of this course is to introduce students to the basic knowledge of programming fundamentals of C language. This course imparts writing skill of C programming to the students and solving problems. This course aims to impart the concepts like looping, array, functions, pointers, file, structure. In this course, topics related to strings, matrices properties will also be simulated.

List of Experiments:

Exp. No. Experiment Name
1 Introduction to C
2 Basic  Input /output functions – printf, scanf, puts, gets etc
3 Proble Solving problems using decision making statements: switch-case, if-else
4 Proble Solving problems using loop statements: for and while loop.
5 Introd Solving problems using one dimensional array and string data
6 Introd Problem solving using two-dimensional array: bubble and selection sort
7 Intro    Introduction to pointers and functions
8 Introd  Problem solving using structures
9 Fil       File processing in C.

 

Course Outcomes (COs):

After successfully completion of this course students will be able to:

CO Description Bloom’s Taxonomy Domain / Level Assessment Tools
CO1 Solve different problems using C programming language. Cognitive / L3 Lab Performance and Lab Final Exam
CO2 Write codes in C for the solution of real – life problems and explain the assignment / project results. Cognitive / L3 Lab Report/ Project Report

Mapping of COs to POs:

CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1   X     X              
CO2         X       X X    

 

Textbook: 

  1. Programming in ANSI C – Balagurusamy. 7th Edition

Reference Book:

  1. Teach Yourself C – Herbert Schildt.
  2. C: The Complete Reference, 4th Ed. – Herbert Schildt.

 

 

EEE 1301: Electronic Circuits I

Theory: 3 Credit Hours

Pre-requisite: EEE 1203

Course Objective:

The objectives of this course are to understand the principle of operation, characteristics, circuit model and the analysis of p-n junction diode in various circuits together with typical applications, to understand the principle of operation, characteristics, circuit model of BJT and FET, to perform analysis of the biasing circuits of BJT and MOSFET amplifiers, to design and perform analysis of basic electronic amplifier circuits.

Course Contents:

P-N junction as a circuit element: Intrinsic and extrinsic semiconductors, operational principle of p-n junction diode, contact potential, current-voltage characteristics of a diode, simplified DC and AC diode models, dynamic resistance and capacitance. Diode circuits: Half-wave and full-wave rectifiers, rectifiers with filter capacitor, characteristics of a Zener diode, Zener shunt regulator, clamping and clipping circuits. Bipolar junction transistor (BJT) as circuit element: Current components, BJT characteristics and regions of operation, BJT as an amplifier, biasing the BJT for discrete circuits, small signal equivalent circuit models, BJT as a switch. Single stage mid-band frequency BJT amplifier circuits: voltage and current gain, input and output impedance of a common base, common emitter and common collector amplifier circuits. Junction field effect transistor (JFET): Structure and physical operation of JFET. Metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) as circuit element: Structure and physical operation of an enhancement MOSFET, threshold voltage, body effect, current-voltage characteristics of an enhancement MOSFET, biasing discrete and integrated MOS amplifier circuits, single stage   MOS amplifiers, MOSFET as a switch. Physical structure and operation of FinFET, Differential and multistage amplifiers.

 

Course Outcomes (COs):

CO Description Bloom’s Taxonomy Domain / Level Assessment Tools
CO1 Explain the physical operation and terminal characteristics of semiconductor diodes, BJT, JFET and MOSFET. Cognitive / L2 Mid-term, Final Exam, Assignment
CO2 Understand diode under DC bias; and its application as rectifier, clipper, clamper, logic gates and voltage regulator using diodes Cognitive / L2 Mid-term, Final Exam, Assignment
CO3 Explain the response of BJT and MOSFET circuits under DC and AC sources Cognitive / L2 Mid-term, Final Exam, Assignment
CO4 Solve circuits consisting of Diode, BJT and FET Cognitive / L3 Mid-term, Final Exam, Assignment

 Mapping of COs to POs:

CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 X                      
CO2   X                    
CO3   X                    
CO4     X                  

 

Textbooks:

  1. Electronic Devices and Circuit Theory” by R. Boylestad, L. Nashelsky
  2. Microelectronic Circuits” by Adel S. Sedra, Kenneth C. Smith
  3. Electronic Devices” by Thomas L. Floyd

Reference Book:

  1. “Introductory Circuit Analysis” – Robert L Boylestad

EEE 1302: Electronic Circuits I Lab

Lab: 1 Credit Hour

Course Objective:

The objective of this course is to verify the circuit theories and concepts taught in EEE 201. The students will carry out lab experiments. They will gain exposure to equipment and learn experimental methods. The students will analyze their results and come to meaningful conclusions within their understanding, being mindful of the errors and uncertainties in their measurements.

List of Experiments:

Exp. No. Experiment Name
1 Study of the Semiconductor Diode Characteristics.
2 Characteristics of Zener Diode.
3 Electronic Circuit Simulation using PSPICE
4 Study of Half wave and full wave rectification
5 Study of Clipping Circuits
6 Study of Clamping Circuits
7 Study of BJT Characteristics
8 Study of MOSFET Characteristics

Course Outcomes (COs):

After successfully completion of this course students will be able to:

CO Description Bloom’s Taxonomy Domain / Level Assessment Tools
CO1 Build and measure or simulate electronic circuits using experimental and simulation tools Psychomotor / L1 Lab Performance and Lab Final Exam
CO2 Write comprehensive reports on the work done in laboratory and/or in a group project, and orally present the project results Cognitive / L2 Lab Report/ Project Report

Mapping of COs to POs:

CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1         X              
CO2                 X X    

Textbooks:

  1. Electronic Devices and Circuits by David Bell

Reference Book:

  1. Electronic Devices and Circuit Theory” by R. Boylestad, L. Nashelsky
  2. Microelectronic Circuits” by Adel S. Sedra, Kenneth C. Smith
  3. Electronic Devices” by Thomas L. Floyd

EEE 2103: Electronic Circuits II

Theory: 3 Credit Hours

Pre-requisite: EEE 1301

Course Objective:

The objectives of this course are to explain the model of operational amplifier and analyze op-amp circuits to perform different operations such as integration, differentiation and filtering on electronic signals; to understand how negative feedback is used to stabilize the gain of an op-amp based amplifier and how positive feedback can be used to design an oscillator; to perform analysis on different classes of power amplifiers, calculations of power and efficiency, and distortion; and to design and perform analysis of electronic amplifier circuits.

Course Contents:

Frequency response of amplifiers: Poles, zeros and bode plots, amplifier transfer function, techniques of determining 3 dB frequencies of amplifier circuits, frequency response of single stage and cascade amplifiers, frequency response of differential amplifiers. Operational amplifiers (Op-Amp): Properties of ideal Op-Amps, non-inverting and inverting amplifiers, inverting integrators, differentiator, weighted summer and other applications of Op-Amp circuits, effects of finite open loop gain and bandwidth on circuit performance, logic signal operation of Op-Amp, DC imperfections. General purpose Op-Amp: DC analysis, small-signal analysis of different stages, gain and frequency response of 741 Op-Amp. Negative feedback: Properties, basic topologies, feedback amplifiers with different topologies, stability frequency compensation. Active filters: Different types of filters and specifications, transfer functions, realization of first and second order low-, high- and band-pass filters using Op-Amps. Positive feedback and signal generators: Basic principle of sinusoidal oscillation, Op-Amp RC oscillator and LC and crystal oscillators. Timer ICs: IC 555 and its applications. Power amplifiers: Classification of output stages, class A, B, C, and AB output stages.

Course Outcomes (COs):

After successfully completion of this course students will be able to:

CO Description Bloom’s Taxonomy Domain / Level Assessment Tools
CO1 Explain the operation of op-amp and its applications in arithmetic and filtering circuits. Cognitive / L2 Mid-term, Final Exam, Assignment
CO2 Describe feedback circuits, oscillators, pulse circuits, waveform generator and multi-vibrators Cognitive / L2 Mid-term, Final Exam, Assignment
CO3 Determine output power, efficiency and frequency response of power amplifiers Cognitive / L3 Mid-term, Final Exam, Assignment
CO4 Analyze electronic application circuits and understand how electronic devices and circuits, and their functions fit into larger electronic systems. Cognitive / L4 Mid-term, Final Exam, Assignment

Mapping of COs to POs:

CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 X                      
CO2 X                      
CO3   X                    
CO4     X                  

Textbooks:

  1. Operational Amplifiers and Linear Integrated Circuits – R.F. Coughlin and F.F. Driscoll
  2. Integrated Electronics: Analog and Digital Circuits and Systems – J. Millman and C.C. Halkias
  3. Microelectronic Circuits – Sedra and Smith
  4. Electronic Design: Circuits and Systems – Savant, Roden and Carpenter

Reference Book:

  1. “Electronic Devices and Circuit Theory” by R. Boylestad, L. Nashelsky

EEE 2104: Electronic Circuits II Lab

Lab: 1 Credit Hour

Course Objective:

The objective of this course is to verify the theories and concepts taught in EEE 203. The students will carry out lab experiments and/or will perform simulation. They will gain exposure to equipment and simulation tools in laboratories and learn experimental methods. The students will analyze their results and come to meaningful conclusions within their understanding, being mindful of the errors and uncertainties in their measurements.

List of Experiments:

Exp. No. Experiment Name
1 Design and Study of an inverting Summing amplifier using 741 op-amp.
2 Design and Study of an inverting difference amplifier using 741 op-amp
3 Design and Study of a Schmitt Trigger Circuit using 741 op-amp.
4 Design and Study of an Astable Multi-vibrator circuit using 741 op-amp for a frequency of oscillation of 10 kHz
5 Design and Study of an Astable Multi-vibrator circuit using 555 timer integrated circuit for a frequency of oscillation of 10 kHz
6 Design and Study of a Wien Bridge Oscillator using 741 op-amp circuit for a frequency of oscillation of 1.6 kHz
7 Design and Study of a Crystal Oscillator using Transistor
8 Design and Study of voltage series Feedback Amplifier using Transistor

Course Outcomes (COs):

After successfully completion of this course students will be able to:

CO Description Bloom’s Taxonomy Domain / Level Assessment Tools
CO1 Build and measure or simulate electronic circuits using experimental and simulation tools Psychomotor / L1 Lab Performance and Lab Final Exam
CO2 Write comprehensive reports on the work done in laboratory and/or in a group project, and orally present the project results Cognitive / L2 Lab Report/ Project Report

Mapping of COs to POs:

CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1         X              
CO2                 X X    

 

Textbooks:

  1. Electronic Devices and Circuit Theory” by R. Boylestad, L. Nashelsky
  2. Microelectronic Circuits” by Adel S. Sedra, Kenneth C. Smith
  3. Electronic Devices” by Thomas L. Floyd

 

EEE 2205: Electrical Machines I

Theory: 3 Credit Hours

Pre-requisite: EEE 1203

Course Objective:

Working principle and characteristics of different types of machines are discussed in this course. The overall objective of this course is to learn how to analyze design mechanisms when specific speed, torque and other parameters are given, and analyze forces in machines. This course includes relative motion analysis and design of single and three phase transformers as well as single and three phase induction motor. Simultaneous graphical and analytical analysis of different machines will also be taught in this course. On completion of this course, the student shall be able to have a basic as well as detailed knowledge of single and three phase transformers as well as single and three phase induction motor.

Course Contents:

Transformer: Ideal transformer-transformer ratio, no-load and load vector diagrams; actual transformer-equivalent circuit, regulation, short circuit and open circuit tests, voltage regulation, per unit quantities, polarity of windings, vector group. Three-phase
transformer: Design and harmonic suppression. Auto and instrumentation transformers.
Three-phase induction motor: Rotating magnetic field, equivalent circuits, vector
diagram, torque-speed characteristics, effect of changing rotor resistance reactance on
torque-speed curves, motor torque, developed rotor power, no-load test, blocked rotor
test, per unit values of machine parameters, starting, braking and speed control. Single
phase induction motor: Theory of operation, equivalent circuit and starting.

Course Outcomes:

After successfully completion of this course students will be able to:

CO Description Bloom’s Taxonomy Domain / Level Assessment Tools
CO1 Explain the working principle and operation of transformer and induction motor. Cognitive / L2 Mid-term, Final Exam
CO2 Understand transformer and induction motors’ equivalent circuits, applications and characteristics. Cognitive / L2 Mid-term, Final Exam
CO3 Understand transformer’s vector group, design of autotransformer, and induction motors’ speed control. Cognitive / L2 Mid-term, Final Exam
CO4 Analyze problems of single phase and three-phase transformer as well as single and three-phase induction motor. Cognitive / L3 Mid-term, Final Exam, Assignment

Mapping of COs to POs:

CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 X                      
CO2 X                      
CO3 X                      
CO4   X                    

Recommended Textbook: 

  1. “Electric Machinery Fundamentals” 4th edition – by Stephen J. Chapman
  2. “Electric Machines” by C. I. Hubert

Reference Book:

1.“A Text Book of Electrical Technology” – Vol. II by B. L. Theraja and A. K. Theraja

 

 

EEE 2309: Electrical Machines II

Theory: 3 Credit Hours

Pre-requisite: EEE 2205

Course Objective:

The objective of this course is to learn construction of synchronous and DC machines. The students will understand the working principle of synchronous and DC machines. They will also study machine characteristics at different operating conditions, be able to develop mathematical models and design of electrical machines, solve complex mathematical problems for determination of machines parameters, explain and analyze machine performance at different loading conditions. And finally the students will grow a passion on electromechanical machines for research and higher studies.

Course Contents:

Synchronous Generators: excitation systems, equivalent circuit, vector diagrams at different loads, factors affecting voltage regulation, synchronous impedance, synchronous impedance method of predicting voltage regulation and its limitations. Parallel operation: Necessary conditions, synchronizing and circulating current and vector diagram. Synchronous motors: Operation, effect of loading under different excitation conditions, effect of changing excitations, V-curves and starting. DC generator: types, no-load voltage characteristics, build-up of a self-excited shunt generator, critical field resistance, load-voltage characteristics, effect of speed on no load and load characteristics and voltage regulation. DC motors: Torque, counter emf, speed, torque-speed characteristics, starting and speed regulation.

Course Outcomes:

After successfully completion of this course students will be able to:

CO Description Bloom’s Taxonomy Domain / Level Assessment Tools
CO1 Learn construction of synchronous and DC machines Cognitive / L2 Mid-term, Final Exam
CO2 Understand the working principle and operation of DC machines and synchronous machines. Cognitive / L2 Mid-term, Final Exam
CO3 Analyze machine performance at different loading conditions. Cognitive / L2 Mid-term, Final Exam
CO4 Solve complex mathematical problems for determination of machines parameters Cognitive / L3 Mid-term, Final Exam, Assignment

Mapping of COs to POs:

CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 X                      
CO2 X                      
CO3 X                      
CO4   X                    

Recommended Textbook: 

  1. “Electric Machinery Fundamentals” 4th edition – by Stephen J. Chapman
  2. “Electric Machines” by C. I. Hubert

Reference Book:

1.“A Text Book of Electrical Technology” – Vol. II by B. L. Theraja and A. K. Theraja

 

EEE 2310: Electrical Machines Lab

Lab: 1 Credit Hour

Course Objective:

The objective of this course is to verify the theories and concepts taught in EEE 205. The students will carry out lab experiments. They will gain exposure to machinery equipments in laboratories and learn experimental methods. The students will analyze their results and come to meaningful conclusions within their understanding, being mindful of the errors and uncertainties in their measurements.

List of Experiments:

Exp. No. Experiment Name
1 Study of transformer.
2 Study of voltage regulation of a transformer.
3 Determination of equivalent circuit parameters of a transformer
4 Study of three-phase transformer with efficiency determination
5 Study of three-phase Induction Motor
6 Study and performance test of single-phase induction motor
7 Study of Open Circuit Characteristics (OCC) and efficiency of DC generator.
8 Plotting V-curves of a synchronous motor.
9 Study of Parallel operation of alternator.

Course Outcomes (COs):

After successfully completion of this course students will be able to:

CO Description Bloom’s Taxonomy Domain / Level Assessment Tools
CO1 Measure parameters of the machine using experimental setup. Psychomotor / L1 Lab Performance and Lab Final Exam
CO2 Write comprehensive reports on the work done in laboratory. Cognitive / L2 Lab Report

Mapping of COs to POs:

CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1     X                  
CO2     X                  

 

Recommended Textbook: 

  1. “Electric Machinery Fundamentals” 4th edition – by Stephen J. Chapman
  2. “Electric Machines” by C. I. Hubert

Reference Book:

1.“A Text Book of Electrical Technology” – Vol. II by B. L. Theraja and A. K. Theraja

EEE 2313: Signals and Systems

Theory, 3 Credit Hours

Pre-requisite: MAT 2101

Course Objective:

Signals and Systems is an introductory course to analog signal processing. Signal processing play an important part of engineering systems in many diverse areas, including sensor data processing, speech processing, image processing, communication system, defense electronics, consumer electronics, and consumer products. The course presents and integrates the basic concepts for continuous-time signals and systems. Signal and system representations are developed for both time and frequency domains. Apart from typical signal representation, the Fourier transform representation of signals and its generalizations are explored in detail.  Filtering and filter design, modulation, and sampling for analog systems, as well as exposition and demonstration of the basic concepts of feedback systems for analog systems, are discussed and illustrated.

Course Contents:

Signals and Systems: Classifications of signals and systems; Basic operations on elementary   signals, impulse function. Basic system properties. Linear Time-Invariant (LTI) Systems:  Time domain analysis of LTI systems -impulse response, zero input response and zero state response and convolution integral. Frequency domain analysis of LTI systems: Fourier Series Representation of Periodic Signals: properties of periodic signals, properties of continuous and discrete-time Fourier series, Fourier series and LTI systems.  Fourier Transform: Properties, convolution and multiplication properties.  Application of Fourier transform to LTI system analysis. Sampling and aliasing. Laplace Transform: Region of convergence, inverse Laplace transform, properties, analysis of LTI systems using Laplace transform.

Course Outcomes:

After successfully completion of this course students will be able to:

CO Description Bloom’s Taxonomy Domain /Level Assessment Tools
CO1 Define different properties of systems and signals. Cognitive /L1 Mid-term exam
CO2 Understand Fourier series, Fourier transform and identify responses of LTI systems under different excitations. Cognitive/L2 Mid-term exam,

Final exam, Assignment

CO3 Interpret the stability of LTI systems. Cognitive /L3 Mid-term exam,

Final exam, Assignment

Mapping of COs to POs:

CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 X                      
CO2 X                      
CO3   X                    

 

Recommended Textbook: 

  1. A.V. Oppenheim and A. S. Willsky, “Signals and Systems”, 2nd ed., Prentice-Hall, 1997.
  2. Digital Signal Processing: Principles, Algorithms and Applications – John G. Proakis and Dimitris K Manolakis
  3. Continuous and Discrete Signals and Systems by Samir S. Soliman and Mandyam D. Srinath

Reference Book:

  1. P. Lathi, “Linear Systems and Signals”, 1st ed., Oxford University Press, 2001.

 

EEE 2216: Numerical Techniques Simulation Lab 

Lab: 1 Credit Hours

Pre-requisite: MAT 2101

Course Objective:

The objective of this course is to learn numerical techniques using computer solution of differentiation and integration problems, transcendental equations, linear and non-linear differential equations and partial differential equations.The students will analyze their results and come to meaningful conclusions within their understanding.

List of Experiments:

Exp. No. Experiment Name
1 Introduction to MATLAB.
2 Study of Interpolation using MATLAB
3 Study of Curve fitting techniques
4 Solution of Simultaneous Linear Algebraic Equations
5 Numerical Differentiation using MATLAB
6 Numerical Integration using MATLAB
7 Solutions to Non-linear Equations
8 Solutions to Linear Differential Equations
9 Solutions to Nonlinear Differential Equations
10 Solution of partial differential equation

Course Outcomes (COs):

After successfully completion of this course students will be able to:

CO Description Bloom’s Taxonomy Domain / Level Assessment Tools
CO1 Learn different numerical methods that are essential for experimental results analysis or simulation. Cognitive / L1 Lab Performance and Lab Final Exam
CO2 Write comprehensive reports on the work done in laboratory. Cognitive / L2 Lab Report

Mapping of COs to POs:

CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 X                      
CO2     X                  

 

Recommended Textbook: 

  1. “Numerical Methods Using MATLAB” by Mathews & Fink
  2. “MATLAB An Introduction with Applications” by Gilat

 

EEE 2301: Digital Electronics

Theory: 3 Credit Hours

Pre-requisite: EEE 1301

Course Objective:

The objectives of this course are to demonstrate the students the fundamentals of number system, Boolean Algebra and their applications in digital design; to demonstrate the students the design rules of combinational and sequential digital logic circuits; to explain the working principles of IC logic families (TTL, ECE and CMOS) and semiconductor memory (ROM, EPROM, EEPROM, SRAM and DRAM).

Course Contents:

Introductory concepts, binary, octal and hexadecimal number systems. The 2’s complement for addition and subtraction. Combinational circuit: BCD, Logic gates and Boolean algebra. Minimization of switching functions, algebraic and graphical simplification of Boolean expression. Arithmetic circuits: Half-adder and full-adder, Parallel adders, BCD adder. decoders, encoders, multiplexers (MUX), demultiplexers (DEMUX), PLA and ROM. Sequential logic circuit: NAND and NOR latches, flip-flops. Counter: asynchronous, synchronous and special counters. Register: Shift registers. Analog to digital conversion (ADC), and Digital-to-analog conversion (DAC): circuits, specifications, applications. Integrated circuit (IC) logic families: TTL, CMOS and ECL. Memory devices: semiconductor memory technologies. ROM architecture, timing, and types of ROM. EPROM, EEPROM, ROM applications. RAM architecture, static and dynamic RAM.

 

Course Outcomes (COs):

After successfully completion of this course students will be able to:

CO Description Bloom’s Taxonomy Domain /Level Assessment Tools
CO1 Apply Boolean algebra and Karnaugh map to simplify complex Boolean functions. Cognitive/ L3 Mid-term exam,

Assignment

CO2 Implement combinational logic circuits like adders, subtractor, encoder, decoder, MUX, DMUX, ROM. Cognitive/ L3 Mid-term exam,

Final exam, Assignment, Mini project

CO3 Implement sequential logic circuits like counters and registers. Cognitive/ L3 Mid-term exam,

Final exam, Assignment, Mini project

CO4 Explain the working principle of semiconductor memories and logic families and their comparative performances. Cognitive/ L2 Mid-term exam,

Final exam, Assignment

 

Mapping of COs to POs:

CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 X                      
CO2   X             X      
CO3   X             X      
CO4 X                      

 

Recommended Textbook: 

  1. Digital Logic and Computer Design – M. Morris Mano.
  2. Fundamentals of Digital Logic with Verilog Design by Stephen Brown and Zvonko Vranesic
  3. Digital Fundamentals by Thomas L. Floyd

Reference Book:

  1. Digital Systems- Ronald J. Tocci and Neal S. Widmer
  2. Digital Logic Design – Mozammel Huq Azad Khan
  3. Fundamentals of Digital Electronics by R. K. Mazumder, H.  M.  Jahirul Haque, S.  K.  Khadem

 

EEE 2302: Digital Electronics Lab

Lab: 1 Credit Hour

Course Objective:

The objectives of this course are to verify the theories and concepts taught in EEE 301; to design different digital systems, simulate and perform experiments and verify results; to analyze the results and come to meaningful conclusions within their understanding, being mindful of the errors and uncertainties in their measurements.

List of Experiments:

Exp. No. Experiment Name
1 Study of basic logic gates
2 Design and implementation of combinational logic circuits using basic gates
3 Design and implementation of adder and subtractor
4 Design and implementation of combinational logic circuits using MUX
5 Design and implementation of asynchronous decade up counter including the 7-segment display using JK FFs.
6 Design and implementation of 3-bit synchronous up counter using JK FFs.
7 Implementation of a 4-bit register and shift register using D FFs.
8 Design and implementation of 4-bit ring counter and twisted ring counter using D FFs.

 

Course Outcomes:

After successfully completion of this course students will be able to:

CO Description Bloom’s Taxonomy Domain / Level Assessment Tools
CO1 Simulate or build and observe digital systems using modern experimental and simulation tools. Psychomotor / L1 Lab Performance and Lab Final Exam
CO2 Write comprehensive reports on the work done in laboratory and/or in a group project, and orally present the project results Cognitive / L2 Lab Report/ Mini Project Report

 

Mapping of COs to POs:

CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1         X              
CO2                 X X    

 

Recommended Textbook: 

  1. Digital Logic and Computer Design – M. Morris Mano.
  2. Fundamentals of Digital Logic with Verilog Design by Stephen Brown and Zvonko Vranesic

Reference Book:

  1. Digital Systems- Ronald J. Tocci and Neal S. Widmer
  2. Digital Logic Design – Mozammel Huq Azad Khan

 

EEE 3103: Digital Signal Processing 

Theory: 3 Credit Hours

Pre-requisite: EEE 2313

Course Objective:

The course is designed to demonstrate the students the basic philosophy of how to analyze discrete sequences both in time and frequency domain. Different applications of transform domain representation of discrete signals and systems and their differences are illustrated through mathematical examples.

Course Contents:

Introduction to digital signal processing. Sampling, quantization and signal
reconstruction. Analysis of discrete-time system in the time domain: impulse response
model, difference equation model. Correlation and convolution: power signal, energy
signal, applications. Z-transform and analysis of LTI systems. Frequency analysis of
discrete-time signals: discrete Fourier series and discrete-time Fourier transform
(DTFT). Frequency analysis of LTI systems. Discrete Fourier transform (DFT) and
fast Fourier transform (FFT). Minimum phase, maximum phase and all pass systems.
Calculation of spectrum of discrete-time signals. Digital filter design- linear phase
filters, specifications, design using window, optimal methods; IIR filters specifications.

Course Outcome (COs):
After successfully completion of this course students will be able to:

 

CO Description Bloom’s Taxonomy Domain /Level Assessment Tools
CO1 Remember the definition of signal, systems and their discrete time and continuous time representation. Cognitive/ L1 Mid-term exam,

Assignment

CO2 Understand the analysis and synthesis equations of z-transform and Fourier transform.

 

Cognitive/ L2 Mid-term exam,

Final exam, Assignment,

CO3 Apply different properties of the transform equations to find relations between representations.

 

Cognitive/ L3 Mid-term exam,

Final exam, Assignment,

CO4 Analyze various transform domain representation in designing filters.

 

Cognitive/ L4 Mid-term exam,

Final exam, Assignment

Mapping of COs to POs:
CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 X                      
CO2 X                      
CO3 X                      
CO4   X X                  

Recommended Textbook: 

  1. Digital Signal Processing (4th Edition), by John G. Proakis& Dimitris K Manolakis.

Reference Book:

  1. Discrete Time Signal Processing (2nd Edition), by Alan V. Oppenheim & Ronald W. Schafer with John R. Buck.

 

EEE 3104: Digital Signal Processing Lab 

Lab: 1 Credit Hour

Course Objective:

The course is designed to demonstrate the students the basic philosophy of how to analyze discrete sequences both in time and frequency domain. Different applications of transform domain representation of discrete signals and systems and their differences are illustrated through mathematical examples.

List of Experiments

Exp. No. Experiment Name
1 Discrete-Time Signals in Time-domain
2 Study of Quantization Error
3 Discrete -Time System and System response.
4 Study of Correlation and its application.
5 Study of DFT, FFT, IDFT and IFFT.
6 Z-transform and Its Application.
7 Study of Aliasing in Time and Frequency Domain.
8 FIR Digital   Filter Design Using Kaiser Window Method.
9 Design of IIR Digital Filters

Course Outcomes (COs):

After successfully completion of this course students will be able to:

CO Description Bloom’s Taxonomy Domain / Level Assessment Tools
CO1 Apply the theoretical contents of digital signal processing both in hardware and software simulation tool Psychomotor / L1 Lab Performance and Lab Final Exam
CO2 Write comprehensive reports on the work done in laboratory. Cognitive / L2 Lab Report

 

Mapping of COs to POs:

CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1     X   X              
CO2                 X X    

 

Recommended Textbook: 

  1. Digital Signal Processing (4th Edition), by John G. Proakis & Dimitris K Manolakis.

Reference Book:

  1. Discrete Time Signal Processing (2nd Edition), by Alan V. Oppenheim & Ronald W. Schafer with John R. Buck.

 

EEE 3105: Electrical Properties of Materials 

Theory: 3 Credit Hours

Pre-requisite: PHY 1101, CHEM 1301

Course Objective:

With the advancement of material science and the techniques for processing materials, a wide range of materials are now available for any imaginable applications particularly in the field of electrical engineering.  When selecting a material for a given application the material properties must satisfy the function and the operating conditions of the component or the structure being designed.  One of the most important properties of material is electrical properties, which directly influence the choice of material.  Electrical properties are their ability to conduct electrical current.  Various electrical properties are resistivity, electrical conductivity, temperature coefficient of resistance, dielectric strength and thermoelectricity.  This course will help to understand and evaluate Electrical, Thermal, Optical and Magnetic properties of materials so that a thorough understanding of the characteristics of materials can be obtained to facilitate the manufacturing technology.

Course Contents:

Crystal structures: Types of crystals, lattice and basis, Bravais lattice and Miller indices. Classical theory of electrical and thermal conduction: scattering, mobility and
resistivity, temperature dependence of metal resistivity, Mathiessen’s rule, Hall effect
and thermal conductivity. Introduction to quantum mechanics: Wave nature of
electrons, Schrödinger’s equation, one dimensional quantum problems infinite quantum
well, potential step and potential barriers, Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle and
quantum box. Band theory of solids: Band theory from molecular orbital, Bloch
theorem, Kronig-Penny model, effective mass, density of states. Carrier statistics:
Maxwell-Boltzmann and Fermi-Dirac distributions, Fermi energy. Dielectric properties of materials: Dielectric constant, polarization- electronic, ionic and orientational; internal field,
Clausius-Mosotti equation, spontaneous polarization, frequency, dependence of
dielectric constant, dielectric loss and piezoelectricity. Magnetic properties of
materials: Magnetic moment, magnetization and relative permittivity, different types of
magnetic materials, origin of ferromagnetism and magnetic domains. Introduction to
superconductivity: Zero resistance and Meissner effect, Type I and Type II
superconductors and critical current density. Magnetic recording materials.
Introduction to meta-materials.

 

Course Outcome (COs):

After successfully completion of this course students will be able to:

CO Description Bloom’s Taxonomy Domain /Level Assessment Tools
CO1 Learn the crystal structures of the materials, concept of solids, and band theory of solids. Cognitive/ L1 Mid-term exam,

Assignment

CO2 Understand the electrical properties of materials including carrier electrical and thermal conduction in solids. Cognitive/ L2 Mid-term exam,

Final exam, Assignment

CO3 Understand the wave nature of electrons, Schrödinger’s equation, one dimensional quantum problems infinite quantum well, potential step and potential barriers, Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle and quantum box. Cognitive/ L2 Mid-term exam,

Final exam, Assignment

CO4 Understand the dielectric and magnetic properties of materials and familiarize with the concepts of super-conductivity and nanotechnology. Cognitive/ L2 Mid-term exam,

Final exam, Assignment

 

Mapping of COs to POs:

CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 X                      
CO2 X                      
CO3   X                    
CO4 X                     X

 

Recommended Textbook: 

  1. Principles of Electronic Materials and Devices, 3rd Edition by S. O. Kasap.

Reference Book:

  1. Semiconductor Physics and Devices, 3rd Edition by Donald A. Neamen

 

EEE 3109: Communication Systems

Theory, 3 Credit Hours

Pre-requisite: EEE 2313

Course Objective:

 

The course is designed to demonstrate the students the basic philosophy of how to correlate the knowledge of Fourier analysis in transmitting analog and digital signals. Methods and procedures of transmitting signals in analog and digital format are discussed in this course.

Course Contents:

Overview of Communication Systems: Basic principles, fundamental elements, system limitations, message source, bandwidth requirements, transmission media types, bandwidth and transmission capacity. Noise: Source, characteristics of various types of noise and S/N ratio. Information Theory: Measure of information, source encoding, error free communication over a noisy channel, channel capacity of a continuous system and channel capacity of a discrete memory less system. Communication Systems: Analog and digital communication, carrier, baseband, band pass and broadband communication; broadcast- and point to point mode of communication. Continuous Wave Modulation and demodulation AM, FM, PM spectral analysis of FM and PM,  Pulse Modulation: Sampling- sampling theorem, Nyquist criterion, aliasing, instantaneous and natural sampling; PAM principle, bandwidth requirements; PCM quantization principle, quantization noise, non-uniform quantization, signal to quantization error ratio, demodulation of PCM, DPCM and DM principle, adaptive DM; line coding formats and bandwidths. Digital Modulation: ASK, FSK, PSK, QPSK, QAM principle, bandwidth   requirements, detection, noise performance; PSK principle, bandwidth requirements, detection, DPSK, QPSK- noise performance, FSK- principle, continuous and discontinuous phase FSK, detection of FSK, MSK- bandwidth requirements. Multiplexing: Introduction to multiplexing: TDMA, FDMA, CDMA, OFDM.

Course Outcomes:

After successfully completion of this course students will be able to:

CO Description Bloom’s Taxonomy Domain/Level Assessment Tools
CO1 Remember the definition of analog and digital signal and topologies regarding noise analysis.

 

Cognitive/ L1 Mid-term exam,

Assignment

CO2 Understand the principles of amplitude and angle modulation both in analog and digital form. Cognitive/ L2 Mid-term exam,

Final exam, Assignment

CO3 Comprehend the difference between various modulation schemes of communication systems. Cognitive/ L2 Mid-term exam,

Final exam, Assignment

CO4 Apply the basic theorems of mathematics to understand noise analysis. Cognitive/ L3 Mid-term exam,

Final exam, Assignment

 

Mapping of COs to POs:
CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 X                      
CO2 X                      
CO3 X                      
CO4   X                    

 

 

Recommended Textbook: 

  1. An Introduction to Analog and Digital Communications, 2nd Edition by Simon Haykin

Reference Book:

  1. Modern Digital and Analog Communication Systems, 4th Edition by B.P. Lathi and Zhi Ding
  2. Digital Communication by Bernard J. Sklar
  3. Data communications and networking by Behrouz A. Forouzan

 

 

EEE 3110: Communication Systems Lab

Lab, 1 Credit Hour

Course Objective:

The objective of this course is to verify the theories and concepts taught in EEE 309. The students will carry out lab experiments. They will gain exposure to machinery equipment in laboratories and learn experimental methods. The students will analyze their results and come to meaningful conclusions within their understanding, being mindful of the errors and uncertainties in their measurements.

List of Experiments:

Exp. No. Experiment Name
1 Amplitude Modulation and Demodulation.
2 DSB-SC generation and coherent detection in MATLAB
3 Phase Modulation and Frequency Modulation in MATLAB
4 Analog to Digital Conversion in MATLAB
5 Design and Study ASK signal using MATLAB
6 Design and Study FSK signal using MATLAB
7 Design and Study PSK signal using MATLAB
8 Design and Study QPSK signal using MATLAB
9 Study of Optical Fiber Communication System

Course Outcomes (COs):

After successfully completion of this course students will be able to:

CO Description Bloom’s Taxonomy Domain / Level Assessment Tools
CO1 Measure and Simulate different communication parameters using experimental setup. Psychomotor / L1 Lab Performance and Lab Final Exam
CO2 Write comprehensive reports on the work done in laboratory. Cognitive / L2 Lab Report

Mapping of COs to POs:

CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1     X   X              
CO2                 X X    

 

Recommended Textbook: 

  1. An Introduction to Analog and Digital Communications, 2nd Edition by Simon Haykin

Reference Book:

  1. Modern Digital and Analog Communication Systems, 4th Edition by B.P. Lathi and Zhi Ding
  2. Digital Communication by Bernard J. Sklar
  3. Data communications and networking by Behrouz A. Forouzan

 

EEE 3207: Power System I

Theory, 3 Credit Hours

Pre-requisite: EEE 1203

Course Objective:

The objective of this course is to explain the importance of power system and operation of different types of power plants. Students will be able to demonstrate the modeling of power system and transmission lines. Introduce the methods of load flow in a power system. Students should get idea to discuss the symmetrical and asymmetrical faults in power system. Briefly explain the operation of different types of power plants.

Course Contents:

Introduction: Objective and importance of the course, Course Outcomes, an overview of power system of Bangladesh, AC and DC transmissions. Review of basic concepts of AC circuits. Power plants: types, general layout of thermal power plant, and major components of gas turbine, steam turbine and combined cycle power plants. Load curves: Demand factor, diversity factor, load duration curves, energy load curves, load factor, capacity factor and plant factor. Network representation: single line and reactance diagram of power system and per Unit calculation. Line representation: equivalent circuit of short, medium and long lines. Reactive compensation of lines. Load flow: Gauss-Siedel and Newton-Raphson Methods.  Power flow control: Tap Changing transformer, Phase shifting, booster and regulating transformer and shunt capacitor. Fault analysis: Symmetrical and Unsymmetrical fault analysis. Protection: Introduction to circuit breakers. Typical Layout of a substation.

Course Outcomes:

After successfully completion of this course students will be able to:

CO Description Bloom’s Taxonomy Domain/Level Assessment Tools
CO1 Explain the operation of different types of power plants and load curves. Cognitive/ L2 Mid-term exam,

Assignment

CO2 Comprehend the transmission line models in power system. Cognitive/ L2 Mid-term exam,

Final exam, Assignment

CO3 Analyze the load flow in power system and implement the control circuitry for voltage regulation and power flow control. Cognitive/ L4 Mid-term exam,

Final exam, Assignment

CO4 Analyze the symmetrical and asymmetrical faults in power system. Cognitive/ L4 Mid-term exam,

Final exam, Assignment

Mapping of COs to POs:

CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 X X                    
CO2   X                    
CO3   X X                  
CO4   X                    

Recommended Textbook: 

  1. Power System Analysis by J. Grainger and W. D. Stevenson

Reference Book:

  1. Power System Engineering (2nd Edition) by D P Kothari & I J Nagrath
  2. Power System Analysis and Design (5th Edition) by J Dunkan Glover, M S Sharma and Thomas J Overbye

 

EEE 3208: Power System I Lab

Lab, 1 Credit Hour

Course Objective:

 

Power System is one of the core subjects in the field of Electrical and Electronics Engineering. The main objective of this lab is to understand the basics of power system, transmission line models, PFI plant, load flow etc.

 

List of Experiments:

 

Exp. No. Experiment Name
1 Introduction to Power System Lab.
2 Study of the transmission line models
3 Study of microprocessor-controlled power factor improvement (PFI) plant
4 Introduction to PSAF (Power Systems Analysis Framework)
5 Load flow study of a power system
6 Short circuit study for a test network
7 Load Flow Study Using MATLAB

 

Course Outcomes (COs):

After successfully completion of this course students will be able to:

CO Description Bloom’s Taxonomy Domain/ Level Assessment Tools
CO1 Conduct simulation and experiment for the analysis of electrical power system characteristics, specially transmission line model, PFI plant, load flow and fault analysis. Psychomotor/L1 Lab Performance and Lab Final Exam
CO2 Write comprehensive reports on the work done in laboratory and/or in a group project, and orally present the project results Cognitive/L2 Lab Report, group project and study tour, peer level evaluation

Mapping of COs to POs:

CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1         X              
CO2                 X X    

 

 

CSE 3209: Data Communication and Computer Networks

Theory: 3 Credit Hours

Pre-requisite: EEE 3109

Course Objective:

This course helps to provide understanding on different basic concepts in data communications and networking. The 7-layer internet model is studied to comprehend the networking theory. The objectives of this course are to provide a thorough understanding basic networking theories and different layers for data communication, to introduce several important features of data communication that are interesting both from a theoretical and also practical point of view, to make students familiar in designing network systems, to emphasize with the building blocks of a network and solving practical problems through approaches, to expose the students on solving real world problems using relevant networking protocols.

Course Contents:

Network Criteria, Physical Structures (Type of Network Connections, Physical Topology), LAN, MAN, WAN, ISP, Protocols; OSI Model, Layers in the OSI Model, TCP/IP protocol Suites, Addressing; Physical Layer: Digital and Analog Signals, Periodic Analog Signals, Transmission Impairment, Data Rate Limits, Performance (Bandwidth, Throughput, Delay), Serial and Parallel Transmission; Data Link Layer: Error detection and Correction-Redundancy, Line Coding, Block Coding, CRC; Modulation Techniques, Multiple Access Protocols-Random Access and Channelization, Framing, Flow and Error Control, Simplest Protocol, Stop and Wait Protocol, Stop-and-wait ARP, Go-back-N ARP, Selective Repeat ARP; Network Layers-Logical Addressing, IPV4 and IPV6 Addresses, Classful Addressing, classless Addressing; Introduction to Network Simulator NS-2; Network Security- Privacy, Cryptography, Public Key Algorithm, Management of Public Key, Communication Security, QoS.

Course Outcomes:

CO Description Bloom’s Taxonomy Domain/Level Assessment Tools
CO1 Describe the principles and concept of data communication and basic networking theories.

 

Cognitive / L2 Mid-term, Final Exam
CO2 Solve a wide range of practical problems using various data communication and networking theories. Cognitive / L3 Mid-term, Final Exam
CO3 Analyze small networks Cognitive / L5  
CO4 Develop solutions to real-life problems Cognitive / L6 Mini Project

Mapping of COs to POs:

CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 X                      
CO2 X                      
CO3     X                  
CO4     X   X              

Recommended Textbook: 

  1. Computer Networks by Andrew S. Tanenbaum
  2. Data Communications and Networking by Behrouz Forouzan

Reference Book:

  1. Data and Computer Communications by William Stallings

 

Course Code CSE 3210
Course Title Data Communication and Computer Networks Lab
Credit Hours 1.00

Detailed syllabus: In this course students will perform experiments to verify practically the theories and concepts learned in CSE 309.

List of Experiments:

Exp. No. Experiment Name
1 Installing and Configuring Network Card
2 PC Network TCP/IP Configuration
3 Introduction to Cisco IOS
4 To write the subnet, Broadcast address and valid host ranges for different IPs
5 Basic Configuration of a router
6 Study LAN using star topology
7 Study LAN using bus topology
8 Study LAN using tree topology

Course Outcomes (COs):

After successfully completion of this course students will be able to:

CO Description Bloom’s Taxonomy Domain / Level Assessment Tools
CO1 Simulate or build and observe data communication and computer networks using modern hardware and software simulation tools. Psychomotor / L1 Lab Performance and Lab Final Exam
CO2 Write comprehensive reports on the work done in laboratory. Cognitive / L2 Lab Report

Mapping of COs to POs:

CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1     X   X              
CO2                 X X    

 

Recommended Textbook: 

  1. Computer Networks by Andrew S. Tanenbaum
  2. Data Communications and Networking by Behrouz Forouzan

Reference Book:

  1. Data and Computer Communications by William Stallings

 

EEE 3311: Microprocessor and Embedded Systems

Theory, 3 Credit Hours

Pre-requisite: CSE1203, EEE 2301

Course Objective:

The objective of this course is to study the structure, behavior, and characteristics of computer systems. This course will exhibit the design of the various functional units of digital computers, discuss different types of memories and their properties, and introduce basics of parallel computer architecture. This course also aims to provide students with the competence to design and understand embedded systems.

Course Contents:

Basic components of a computer system. Simple-As-Possible (SAP) computer: SAP-1, selected concepts from SAP-2 and SAP-3 (jump, call, return, stack, push and pop). Evolution of microprocessors. Introduction to Intel 8086 microprocessor: features, architecture. Minimum mode operation of 8086 microprocessor: system timing diagrams of read and write cycles. Memory interfacing: memory banks, design of decoders for RAM, ROM and PORT. Introduction to Intel 8086 Assembly Language Programming: basic instructions, logic, shift and rotate instructions, addressing modes, stack management and procedures, advanced arithmetic instructions for multiplication and division, interrupt instructions. Hardware Interfacing with Intel 8086 microprocessor: programmable peripheral interface, programmable interrupt controller, programmable timer, serial communication interface, keyboard and display interface (LED, 7-segment, dot matrix and LCD).

Course Outcomes:

After successfully completion of this course students will be able to:

CO Description Bloom’s Taxonomy Domain/Level Assessment Tools
CO1 Understand the architectural concept of digital computers Cognitive/L2 Midterm and Final Exams
CO2 Explain the design and operation of the functional units of digital computers Cognitive/L2 Midterm and Final Exams
CO3 Interpret instruction sets Cognitive/L3 Midterm and Final Exams
CO4 Analyze the design specifications and Design and Implement microcontroller-based embedded systems Cognitive/L4 Mini Project and Peer level evaluation

Mapping of COs to POs:

CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 X                      
CO2 X                      
CO3 X                      
CO4     X X X       X X   X

Recommended Textbook: 

  1. “The Intel Microprocessors – Architecture, Programming, and Interfacing” by Barry B. Brey
  2. “Embedded System Architecture: A Comprehensive Guide for Engineers and Programmers” by Tammy Noergaard, Newnes

 

Reference Book:

  1. “Structured Computer Organization” by Andrew Tanenbaum, Prentice Hall
  2. “Embedded system: From Hardware to Application” by P. Raghavan, Auerbach
  3. “Computer Organization & Design” by David A. Patterson and John L. Hennessy, Morgan Kaufmann
  4. Microprocessors and Interfacing: Programming and Hardware by D. V. Hall
  5. “Microcomputer Systems: The 8086/8088 Family Architecture, Programming Design” by Y. Liu and G. A. Gibson

 

EEE 3312: Microprocessor and Embedded Systems Lab

Lab, 1 Credit Hour

Course Objective:

The objective of this course is to verify the theories and concepts taught in EEE 311. The students design, implement and analyze various functional units of digital computers. They will gain exposure to training kits and simulation tools. The students will analyze their results and come to meaningful conclusions within their understanding.

List of Experiments

Exp. No. Experiment Name
1 Design and implement an 8-bit simple ALU design
2 Design and implement an 4×4 RAM design
3 Implement and analyze a Simple-As-Possible (SAP) – 1 Computer
4 Explore debugger using different commands
5 To understand the basic concept and functionality of Assembly Language
6 Introduction to MDA – 8086 Training Kit
7 Interface a keypad with Microcontroller
8 Interface an LCD with Microcontroller

Course Outcomes (COs)

After successfully completion of this course students will be able to:

CO Description Bloom’s Taxonomy Domain/ Level Assessment Tools
CO1 Implement and simulate functional units of digital computers Psychomotor/L1 Lab Performance and Lab Final Exam
CO2 Write comprehensive reports on the work done in laboratory Cognitive/L2 Lab Report

Mapping of COs to POs:

CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1         X              
CO2                   X    

 

EEE 3313: Electromagnetic Fields and Waves

Theory, 3 Credit Hours

Pre-requisite: PHY 1101, MAT 2101

Course Objective:

Objective of this course is to provide the basic skills required to understand various engineering aspects involving electromagnetic fields. This course assists students understanding basic concepts of electromagnetic theory, principles of electromagnetic radiation, Electromagnetic boundary conditions and electromagnetic wave propagation. This course also helps investigating the concept of planar wave and polarization.

Course Contents:

Static electric field: Postulates of electrostatics, Coulomb’s law for discrete and continuously distributed charges, Gauss’s law and its application, electric potential due to charge distribution, conductors and dielectrics in static electric field, flux density boundary conditions; capacitance- electrostatic energy and forces, energy in terms of field equations, capacitance calculation of different geometries; boundary value problems- Poisson’s and Laplace’s equations in different co-ordinate systems. Steady electric current: Ohm’s law, continuity equation, Joule’s law, resistance calculation. Static Magnetic field: Postulates of magnetostatics, Biot-Savart’s law, Ampere’s law and applications, boundary conditions for magnetic field, magnetic characteristics of different geometries. Time varying fields and Maxwell’s equations: Faraday’s law of electromagnetic induction, Maxwell’s equations – differential and integral forms, boundary conditions, potential functions; time harmonic fields and Poynting theorem. Plane electromagnetic wave: plane wave in loss less media- polarization of plane wave; good conductors; group velocity, instantaneous and average power densities, normal and oblique incidence of plane waves at plane boundaries for different polarization.

Course Outcomes:

After successfully completion of this course students will be able to:

CO Description Bloom’s Taxonomy Domain/Level Assessment Tools
CO1 Understand vector algebra and calculus in solving electromagnetic problems Cognitive / L2 Mid-term, Final Exam
CO2 Describe electromagnetic fields for electrostatics, steady current, magneto-statics and time varying conditions in solving electromagnetic problems Cognitive / L2 Mid-term, Final Exam
CO3 Interpret Maxwell’s equation in differential and integral forms. Cognitive / L3 Mid-term, Final Exam, Assignment
CO4 Comprehend the phenomena of wave propagation, interactions of electromagnetic waves with materials and concept of polarization. Cognitive / L2 Mid-term, Final Exam, Assignment

Mapping of COs to POs:

CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 X                      
CO2 X                      
CO3   X                    
CO4   X                    

 

Recommended Textbook: 

  1. Engineering Electromagnetics” 6th edition – by William J. Hayt and John A. Buck

 

  1. “Element of Electromagnetics” 4th edition – by Matthew N. O. Sadiku

 

Reference Book:

  1. ““Fields and Waves in Communication Electronics” – by S. Ramo, J. R. Whinnery, and T.V. Duzer
  2. Field and Wave Electromagnetics” 2nd edition – by D. K. Cheng

 

 

 

EEE 3316: Electrical Service Design Lab

Lab, 1 Credit Hour

Pre-requisite: EEE 1203

Course Objective:

The objective of this course is to acquire practical knowledge about electrical service design for home and industries. The students will design the electrical services for different conditions. They will gain exposure to CAD tools for electrical service design. They will also learn about safety measures and different aspects that are considered while doing electrical design for a structure. Students will analyze their designs and come to meaningful conclusions within their understanding, being mindful of the errors and miscalculations.

List of Experiments:

Exp. No. Experiment Name
1 Introduction to Electrical Service Design (ESD)
2 Study of Wiring Materials, Accessories and Protective Devices in ESD.
3 Study of outdoor low voltage lines and cables and underground distribution lines
4 Introduction to Standard Regulations, Codes and Effective Electrical Design
5 Study of Lighting Schemes in ESD
6 Introduction to CAD tools for ESD
7 Application of CAD tools for ESD
8 Designing Electrical Services for an Industry or Home

Course Outcomes (COs):

After successfully completion of this course students will be able to:

CO Description Bloom’s Taxonomy Domain/Level Assessment Tools
CO1 Understand the underlying implications for electrical service design. Cognitive / L2 Lab Final Exam
CO2 Analyze design specifications and apply ESD rules in designing services for various infra-structures. Cognitive / L4 Mini Project

Mapping of COs to POs:

CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 X                      
CO2     X X X       X X    

 

Textbooks

 

  1. Gupta B.R., 2005: Power system Analysis and design, S. Chand and company Ltd, Ram Nagar, New Delhi-110055. Lakervi E and Homes E.J., 1989:
  2. Electricity Distribution Network design. Peter Peregrinus Ltd, England, pp319 National Electrical Code, NEC, 2011, International Series, pp.857 ABB, XLPE
  3. Cable System User’s Guide (Accessed 2006) at www.abb.com/cables. pp.31
  4. Bennett Lighting Catalogue, 1997/98, pp.46 Thorn comprehensive product catalogue, 2003/2004; www.thornlihting.co.uk

 

EEE 4103: Control System I 

Theory: 3 Credit Hours

Pre-requisite: EEE 2313

Course Objective:

Control Systems is the study of the analysis of the output behaviors of electrical/mechanical/dynamical systems subject to input signals. The topics covered in this course can be used in a wide spectrum of engineering disciplines such as mechanical, electrical, aerospace, manufacturing, and biomedical engineering. The course is designed to demonstrate the students – (a) the basic philosophy of how to correlate the knowledge of Laplace Transform to represent various systems and the relevant mathematical analysis, (b) definition and application of different characteristic parameters of system and (c) the method of controlling different parameters to achieve desired output of any system.

Course Contents:

Laplace transform, Initial and Final value theorems.  Transfer Functions: Open-loop stability, Poles, Zeros, Time response, Transients, Steady-state, Block diagrams and signal flow diagram, Feedback principles: Open versus Closed-loop control, High gain control, Inversion; State variables: Signal flow diagram to state variables, transfer function to state variable and state variable to transfer function, Stability of closed-loop systems: Routh’s method, Root locus, PID control: Structure, Design using root locus, Pole assignment: PI and PID synthesis using pole assignment, Frequency Response: Nyquist plot, Bode diagram, Nyquist stability theorem, Stability margins, Closed-loop sensitivity functions, Model errors, Robust stability, Controller design using frequency response: Proportional control, Lead-lag control, PID control, Digital control systems: introduction, sampled data systems, stability analysis in Z-domain.

Course Outcome (COs):

After successfully completion of this course students will be able to:

CO Description Bloom’s Taxonomy Domain/Level Assessment Tools
CO1 Understand the basics of control system engineering and systems modeling in the frequency domain, Laplace transform. Cognitive / L2 Mid-term, Final Exam
CO2 Analyze systems modeling in the time domain, state space representation. Cognitive / L4 Mid-term, Final Exam
CO3 Analyze time responses of systems – i) poles, zeroes, and system response ii) 1st/2nd order systems iii) stability of systems Cognitive / L4 Mid-term, Final Exam, Assignment
CO4 Analyze the root locus of control systems. Cognitive / L4 Mid-term, Final Exam, Assignment

 

Mapping of COs to POs:

CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 X                      
CO2   X                    
CO3   X                    
CO4   X                    

 

Recommended Textbook: 

  1. Control System Engineering, 6th Edition by Noman S. Nise

Reference Book:

  1. Modern Control Systems, 12th Edition by Richard C. Dorf and Robert H. Bishop

 

EEE 4104: Control System I Lab 

Lab: 1 Credit Hour

Course Objective:

The objective of this course is to verify the theories and concepts taught in EEE 403. The students will carry out lab experiments and/or will perform simulation. They will gain exposure to equipment and simulation tools in laboratories and learn experimental methods. The students will analyze their results and come to meaningful conclusions within their understanding, being mindful of the errors and uncertainties in their measurements.

List of Experiments

Exp. No. Experiment Name
1 Study Laplace Transform using MATLAB
2 Study the time response of an underdamped second order system
3 Modelling with transfer function of a simple train system in MATLAB.
4 Modelling of DC motor speed with state space in MATLAB.
5 Modeling with PID Controllers in MATLAB
6 Modeling with root locus in MATLAB.
7 Frequency Response Analysis and Design
8 Modeling the transfer function of a simple system with Simulink

Course Outcomes (COs):

After successfully completion of this course students will be able to:

CO Description Bloom’s Taxonomy Domain/Level Assessment Tools
CO1 Design, build, measure and simulate controller using experimental and simulation tools Psychomotor/L1 Lab Performance and Lab Final Exam, Mini project
CO2 Write comprehensive reports on the work done in laboratory and/or in a group project, and demonstration the ability to work as an individual and within a team Cognitive/L2 Lab Report and peer level evaluation

Mapping of COs to POs:

CO PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1     X X X              
CO2                 X X    

 

Textbooks

 

  1. Control Systems Engineering” by Norman S. Nise
  2. Modern Control Systems” by Dorf

 

 

 

 

 

Course Code PHY 11 01
Course Title Engineering Physics
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite None

Detail syllabus: Waves and optics: Generalized wave equation, damped oscillation, forced oscillation, resonance, progressive wave, transverse wave, power and intensity of wave, stationary wave, group and phase velocity.  Light as electromagnetic wave, interference of light, reflection, diffraction and refraction of light. Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction by single and double slit, diffraction gratings. Polarization and polarized light. Thermal Physics: Heat and work- the first law of thermodynamics and its applications; Maxwell’s distribution of molecular speeds, reversible and irreversible processes, Carnot’s cycle, second law thermodynamics, Carnot’s theorem, entropy. Magnetism: magnetic quantities and variables: Flux density, magnetomotive force, magnetic field strength, permeability and B-H curve, reluctance. Laws in magnetic circuits: Ampere’s circuital law and Faraday’s law. Magnetic circuits: Composite series magnetic circuit, parallel, and series-parallel circuits. Hysteresis loss and magnetic materials. Introduction to quantum physics: wave particle quality, photoelectric effect, introduction to quantum well, quantum dot, nanowire.

 

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. A Textbook of Optics: by Subramaniam and Brijlal
  2. Introduction to Quantum Mechanics by D. J. Griffith
  3. Elements of Properties of Matter by D. S. Mathur
  4. The Physics of Vibrations and Waves by H. J. Pain
  5. Introduction to Classical Mechanics by R. G. Takwale and P. S. Puranik
  6. Physical Optics by A. K. Ghatak

 

Course Code PHY 1102
Course Title Engineering Physics Lab
Credit Hours 1.00

Detail syllabus: In this course students will perform experiments to verify practically the theories and

concepts learned in PHY 101.

 

 

Course Code CHEM 1301
Course Title Chemistry (Inorganic and Organic Chemistry)
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite None

Detail syllabus: Atomic Structure, quantum numbers, electronic configuration, periodic table. Properties and uses of noble gases. Different types of chemical bonds and their properties. Molecular structures of compounds. Selective organic reactions. Different types of solutions and their compositions. Phase rule, phase diagram of mono component system. Properties of dilute solutions. Thermochemistry, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibria. Ionization of water and pH concept. Electrical properties of solution.

 

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. Concise Inorganic Chemistry by J. D. Lee.
  2. Basic Inorganic Chemistry by F. A. Cotton, G. Wilkinson and P. L. Gaus.
  3. Chemistry by R. Chang, K. A. Goldsby.
  4. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry by S. Prakash, G.D. Tuli, S. K. Basu, and R. D. Madan.
  5. Organic Chemistry – Study Guide to Organic Chemistry by R. T. Morrison, R. N. Boyd.
  6. Organic Chemistry by T. W. G. Solomon.
Course Code CHEM 1302
Course Title Chemistry Lab
Credit Hours 1.00

Detail syllabus: In this course, students will perform experiments on volumetric analysis such as acid base

titration, oxidation-reduction titrations, determination of Fe, Cu and Ca volumetrically. These concepts are learned in CHEM 1301

 

Course Code MAT 1101
Course Title Differential and Integral Calculus
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite: None

Detailed syllabus: Differential calculus: Functions of real variable and their plots, limit. Continuity and derivatives, physical meaning of derivative of a function. Successive derivatives:   Leibniz Theorem; Roll’s theorem, new value theorem, and Taylor’s theorem. Taylor’s   and Maclaurin’s series and expansion inunctions. Maximum and minimum values of   function: Functions of two or three variables partial and total derivatives. Euler’s   theorem. Tangent and normal. Subtangent and subnormal in Cartesian and polar coordinates. Curvature, asymptotes and curve tracing. Integral Calculus: Different   techniques of integration. Definite integral as the limit of a sum and as an area.   Definition of remain integral, fundamental theorem of integral calculus and its   applications to definite integrals, reduction formulae, Walli’s formulae. Improper   integrals. Improper integrals: Beta and gamma functions.

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. Calculus by Howard Anton, 10th edition
  2. Calculus – An Applied Approach by Ron Larson, Eight Edition
  3. Engineering Mathematics by John Bird

 

Course Code MAT 1201
Course Title Coordinate Geometry and Linear Algebra
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite MAT 1101

Detailed syllabus: Geometry: Double integration: Evaluation of surface areas and volumes by integration. Area under a plane curve in Cartesian and polar coordinates. Area of the region   enclosed by two curves in Cartesian and polar coordinates, Trapezoidal rule, Simpson’s   rule, Arc lengths of curves, in Cartesian and polar coordinates, parametric and pedal   equations, Intrinsic equation. Volumes of solids of revolution. Volumes of hollow   solids of revolutions by shell method. Area of surface of revolution. Linear Algebra:   Introduction to systems of linear equations. Gaussian elimination. Definition of   matrices. Algebra of matrices. Transpose of a matrix and inverse of matrix.   Factorization. Determinants. Quadratic forms. Matrix polynomials. Euclidean n-space.   Linear transformation from IRn to IRm. Properties of linear transformation from IRn   to IRm. Real vector spaces and subspaces. Basis and dimension. Rank and nullity. Inner   product spaces. Gram-Schmidt process and QR-decomposition. Eigenvalues and   eigenvectors. Diagonalization. Linear transformations. Kernel and Range. Application   of linear algebra to electric networks.

 

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. Co-ordinate Geometry with Vector Analysis– Rahman & Bhattacharjee
  2. Vector Analysis – M R Spiegel
  3. Linear Algebra- Prof. Abdur Rahman
Course Code MAT 2101
Course Title Differential Equations and Numerical Analysis
Credit Hours

Pre-requisite

3.00

MAT 1201

Detailed syllabus: Ordinary Differential Equations: Degree and order of ordinary differential equations, formation of differential equations. Solution of first order differential equations by   various methods. Solution of general linear equations of second and higher orders with   constant coefficients. Solution of homogeneous linear equations. Solution of   differential equations of the higher order when the dependent or independent variables   are absent. Solution of differential equation by the method based on the factorization of   the operators. Frobenius method. Partial Differential Equations: Introduction. Linear   and non-linear first order equations. Standard forms. Linear equations of higher order.   Equations of the second order with variable coefficients. Wave equations. Particular   solution with boundary and initial conditions.

 

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. Differential Equations – Dr. B. D. Sharma
  2. Numerical Analysis – S. S. Sastry.
Course Code MAT 2203
Course Title Complex Variable and Mathematical Methods
Credit Hours

Pre-requisite

3.00

MAT 2101

Detailed syllabus: Complex Variable: De-Moiver’s theorem & its application, Functions of a complex variable, Limit, Continuity & Differentiability of a function of complex variable, Analytic functions, Cauchy-Riemann equations, Cauchy’s theorem, Singularity & poles, Residues, Simple contour integration. Vector Analysis: Vector components, Vector components in spherical and cylindrical system, Derivative of vector, Vector operators, Del, Gradient, Divergence and Curl. Their physical significance, Vector integration, Line, Surface and Volume integration, Green’s and Stoke’s theorem and their applications. Laplace Transformation: Definition of Laplace transform (LT), LT of different functions, First Shift theorem, Inverse transform, Linearity, Use of first shift theorem and Partial functions, Transform of derivative, Transform of an integral, Heaviside unit function, The 2nd shift theorem, Periodic functions, Convolutions, Solution of ordinary differential equation by Laplace transform. Fourier Analysis: Real and Complex form, Finite transform, Fourier integral, Fourier series and convergence of Fourier series, Fourier transform and uses in solving boundary value problem.

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. Engineering Mathematics: A Foundation for Electronic, Electrical, Communications and Systems Engineers by Croft, A., Hargeaves, M., Davison, R.
  2. Theory and problems of Complex Variables Murry R.Spigel
  3. Laplace Transform, Murray R. Spigel, Schaum’s outline series
  4. Fourier Transform, Murray R. Spigel, Schaum’s outline series
Course Code STA 2101
Course Title Probability and Statistics
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite MAT 1201

Detailed syllabus: Introduction. Sets and probability. Random variable and its probability distribution. Treatment of grouped sampled data. Some discrete probability distribution. Normal distribution. Sampling theory. Estimation theory. Tests of hypothesis. Regression and correlation. Analysis of variance.

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. Theory and problems of Statistics – Murray R Spiegel (Schaum’s outline series)
  2. Statistics and Probability – Nurul Islam
  3. Statistics and Probability – Walpole

 

 

 

 

 

Major Concentration

 

Electronics Group

 

Course Code EEE 4401
Course Title Solid State Devices
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite EEE 1301

Detailed syllabus: Semiconductors in equilibrium: Energy bands, intrinsic and extrinsic   semiconductors, Fermi levels, electron and hole concentrations, temperature dependence of carrier concentrations and invariance of Fermi level. Carrier transport processes and excess carriers: Drift and diffusion, generation and recombination of excess carriers, built-infield, recombination-generation SRH formula, surface recombination, Einstein relations, continuity and diffusion equations for holes and electrons and quasi-Fermi level. PN junction: Basic structure, equilibrium conditions, contact potential, equilibrium Fermi level, space charge, non-equilibrium condition, forward and reverse bias, carrier injection, minority and majority carrier currents, transient and AC conditions, time variation of stored charge, reverse recovery transient and capacitance. Bipolar Junction Transistor: Basic principle of pnp and npn transistors, emitter efficiency, base transport factor and current gain, diffusion equation in the base, terminal currents, coupled-diode model and charge control analysis, Ebers-Moll model and circuit synthesis. BJT non-ideal effects; Hetero-junction transistors. Metal semiconductor junction: Energy band diagram of metal semiconductor junctions, rectifying and ohmic contacts. MOS structure: MOS capacitor, energy band diagrams and flat band voltage, threshold voltage and control of threshold voltage, static C-V characteristics, qualitative theory of MOSFET operation, body effect and current voltage relationship of a MOSFET. Non-ideal characteristics of MOSFET: channel length modulation and short-channel effects in MOSFETs. MOS scaling. Introduction to Multigate FET architecture: Double gate MOSFET, FinFET, Surrounding gate FET, high-K dielectric FETs.

 

Recommended Textbook: 

  1. Semiconductor Physics and Devices: Basic Principles by Donald A. Neaman (Third edition)

Reference Books:

  1. Semiconductor Device Fundamentals by Rober F. Pierret
  2. Solid State Electronic Devices by Ben G. Streetman and Sanjay Kumar Banerjee

 

Course Code EEE 4421
Course Title Analog Integrated Circuits
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite EEE 2103

Detailed syllabus: Passive and active loads and frequency limitation. Current mirror: Basic, cascade and active current mirror. Differential Amplifier: Introduction, large and small signal analysis, common mode analysis and differential amplifier with active load. Noise: Introduction to noise, types, representation in circuits, noise in single stage and differential amplifiers and bandwidth. Band-gap references: Supply voltage independent biasing, temperature independent biasing, proportional to absolute temperature current generation and constant transconductance biasing. Switching capacitor circuits: Sampling switches, switched capacitor circuits including unity gain buffer, amplifier and integrator. Phase Locked Loop (PLL): Introduction, basic PLL and charge pumped PLL.

Reference Textbooks:

  1. Op-Amps and Linear Integrated Circuits by R. A. Gayakwad
  2. Linear Integrated Circuits by D. R. Choudhuy, S. Jain

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. Digital Integrated Electronics by H. Taub, D. Schilling
  2. Introduction to System Design Using IC’s by B. S. Sonde
  3. Operational Amplifiers and Linear Integrated Circuits by R. F. Coughlin, F. F. Driscoll
Course Code EEE 4423
Course Title Processing and Fabrication Technology
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite EEE 3105

Detailed syllabus: Substrate materials: Crystal growth and wafer preparation, epitaxial growth technique, molecular beam epitaxy, chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Doping techniques: Diffusion and ion implantation. Growth and deposition of dielectric layers: Thermal oxidation, CVD, plasma CVD, sputtering and silicon-nitride growth. Etching: Wet chemical etching, silicon and GaAs etching, anisotropic etching, selective etching, dry physical etching, ion beam etching sputtering and etching and reactive ion etching. Cleaning: Surface cleaning, organic cleaning and RCA cleaning. Lithography: Photoreactive materials, pattern generation, pattern transfer and metallization. Discrete device fabrication: Diode, transistor, resistor and capacitor. Integrated circuit fabrication: Isolation-pn junction isolation, mesa isolation and oxide isolation. BJT based microcircuits, p-channel and n-channel MOSFETs, complimentary MOSFETs and silicon on insulator devices. Testing, bonding and packaging.

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. Semiconductor Technology: Processing and Novel Fabrication Techniques by M. E. Levinshtein, M. S. Shur.
  2. Photomask Fabrication Technology by B. G. Eynon, B. Wu.
Course Code EEE 4425
Course Title VLSI I
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite EEE 2301

Detailed syllabus: VLSI technology: Top down design approach, technology trends and design styles. Review of MOS transistor theory: Threshold voltage, body effect, I-V equations and characteristics, latch-up problems NMOS inverter, CMOS inverter, pass-transistor and transmission gates. CMOS circuit characteristics and performance estimation: Resistance, capacitance, rise and fall times, delay, gate transistor sizing and power consumption. CMOS circuit and logic design: Layout design rules and physical design of simple logic gates. CMOS system design: Address, multiplier and memory system, arithmetic logic unit. Programmable logic arrays. I/O systems. VLSI testing.

 

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. CMOS Circuit Design, Layout and Simulation, Modern VLSI Design: Systems on Silicon by R. J. Baker, H. W. Li, D. E. Boyce
  2. Design of VLSI Systems: A Practical Introduction by L. E. M. Brackenbury

 

Course Code EEE 4426
Course Title VLSI I Lab
Credit Hours 1.00

Detailed syllabus: This course consists of two parts. In the first part, students will perform experiments to verify practically the theories and concepts learned in EEE 425. In the second part, students will design simple systems using the principles learned in EEE 425.

 

Course Code EEE 4427
Course Title VLSI II
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite EEE 4425

Detailed syllabus: VLSI MOS system design: Layout extraction and verification, full and semi-full custom design styles and logical and physical positioning. Design entry tools: Schematic capture and HDL. Logic and switch level simulation. Static timing. Concepts and tools of analysis, solution techniques for floor planning, placement, global routing and detailed routing. Application specific integrated circuit design including FPGA.

 

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. Digital Integrated Circuits: J. M. Rabaey
  2. Silicon VLSI Technology: Fundamentals, Practice and Modeling: J. D. Plummer, M. D. Dealand P. B. Griffin
Course Code EEE 4428
Course Title VLSI II Lab
Credit Hours 1.00

Detailed syllabus: This course consists of two parts. In the first part, students will perform experiments to verify practically the theories and concepts learned in EEE 427. In the second part, students will design simple systems using the principles learned in EEE 427.

 

Course Code EEE 4429
Course Title Compound Semiconductor and Hetero-Junction Devices
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite EEE 3105

Detailed syllabus: Compound semiconductor: Zinc-blend crystal structures, growth techniques, alloys, band gap, density of carriers in intrinsic and doped compound semiconductors, Hetero Junctions: Band alignment, band offset, Anderson’s rule, single and double sided hetero-junctions, quantum wells and quantization effects, lattice mismatch and strain, and common hetero-structure material systems. Hetero-Junction diode: Band banding, carrier transport and I-V characteristics. Hetero-junction field effect transistor: Structure and principle, band structure, carrier transport and I-V characteristics. Hetero-structure bipolar transistor (HBT): Structure and operating principle, quasi-static analysis, extended Gummel-Poon model, Ebers-Moll model, secondary effects and band diagram of graded alloy base HBT.

 

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. Compound Semiconductor Electronics: The Age of Maturity by M. Shur.
  2. SiGe Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors by Peter Ashburn.

 

Course Code EEE 4430
Course Title Optoelectronics
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite EEE 3105

Detailed syllabus: Optical properties in semiconductor: Direct and indirect band-gap materials, radiative and non-radiative recombination, optical absorption, photo-generated excess carriers, minority carrier life time, luminescence and quantum efficiency in radiation. Properties of light: Particle and wave nature of light, polarization, interference, diffraction and blackbody radiation. Light emitting diode (LED): Principles, materials for visible and infrared LED, internal and external efficiency, loss mechanism, structure and coupling to optical fibers. Stimulated emission and light amplification: Spontaneous and stimulated emission, Einstein relation, population inversion, absorption of radiation, optical feedback and threshold conditions. Semiconductor Lasers: population inversion in degenerate semiconductors, laser activity, operating wavelength, threshold current density, power output, hetero-junction lasers, optical and electrical confinement. Introduction to quantum well lasers. Photo-detectors: Photoconductors, junction photodetectors, PIN detectors, avalanche photodiodes and phototransistors. Solar cells: Solar energy and spectrum, silicon and Schottkey solar cells. Modulation of light: Phase and amplitude modulation, electro-optic effect, acousto-optic effect and magneto-optic devices. Introduction to integrated optics.

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. Electrochromism and Electrochromic Devices: P. Monk, R. J. Mortimer, D. R. Rosseinsky
  2. Optical System Design: R. Fischer, P. R. Yoder, B. T. Galeb

 

Course Code EEE 4431
Course Title Biomedical Instrumentation
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite EEE 3103

Detailed syllabus: Human body: Cells and physiological systems. Bioelectricity: Genesis and characteristics. Measurement of bio-signals: Ethical issues, transducers, amplifiers and filters. Electrocardiogram: Electrocardiography, phono-cardiograph, vector cardiograph, analysis and interpretation of cardiac signals, cardiac pacemakers and defibrillator. Blood pressure: Systolic, diastolic mean pressure, electronic manometer, detector circuits and practical problems in pressure monitoring. Blood flow measurement: Plethymography and electromagnetic flow meter. Measurement and interpretation: Electroencephalogram, cerebral angiograph and cronical X-ray. Brain scans. Electromayogram (EMG). Tomography: Positron emission tomography and computer tomography. Magnetic resonance imaging. Ultrasonography. Patient monitoring system and medical telemetry. Effect of electromagnetic fields on human body.

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. Biophysics Concept and Mechanism by C. J. Casey
  2. Introduction to Biomedical Equipment Technology by J. J Carr, J. M. Brown
  3. Medical Instrumentation by J. G. Webster
  4. Medical Physics by J. G. Skofronick

 

Course Code EEE 4432
Course Title Biomedical Instrumentation Lab
Credit Hours 1.00

Detailed syllabus: The objective of this course is to verify the theories and concepts taught in EEE 431. The students will carry out lab experiments. The students will analyze their results and come to meaningful conclusions within their understanding, being mindful of the errors and uncertainties in their measurements

 

Course Code EEE 4433
Course Title Power Electronics
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite EEE 2103

Detailed syllabus: Power semiconductor and switches and triggering devices: BJT, MOSFET, SCR, IGBT, GTO, TRISE, UJT and DIAC. Rectifiers: Uncontrolled and controlled single phase and three phase. Regulated power supplies: Linear- series and shunt, switching buck, buckboost, boost and Cuk regulators. AC voltage controllers: single and three phase. Choppers. DC motor control. Single phase cyclo converter. Inverters: Single and three-phase voltage and current sources. AC motor control. Stepper motor control. Resonance inverters. Pulse-width modulation control of static converters.

Recommended Textbook: 

  1. Power Electronics by Daniel W. Hart

Reference Book:

  1. Power Electronics by M.H. Rashid
  2. Power Electronics by Jamil Ashgar

 

Course Code EEE 4434
Course Title Power Electronics Lab
Credit Hours 1.00

Detailed syllabus: This course consists of two parts. In the first part, students will perform experiments to verify practically the theories and concepts learned in EEE 433. In the second part, students will design simple systems using the principles learned in EEE 433.

 

Course Code EEE 4435
Course Title Semiconductor Physics
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite EEE 3105

Detailed syllabus: Lattice vibration: Simple harmonic model, dispersion relation, acoustic and Optical phonons, Band structure: Isotropic and anisotropic crystals, band diagrams and effective masses of different semiconductors and alloys. Scattering theory: Review of classical theory, Fermi-Golden rule, scattering rates of different processes, scattering mechanisms in different semiconductors, mobility. Different carrier transport models: Drift-diffusion theory, ambipolar transport, hydrodynamic model, Boltzmann transport equations, quantum mechanical model, simple applications.

 

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. Semiconductor Physics and Devices by D. A. Neamen
  2. Solid State Electronic Device by M. N. Horenstein
  3. Semiconductor Devices Physics and Technology by S. M. Sze
  4. Solid State Electronic Devices by B. Y. Streetman, S. K. Banerjee

 

Course Code EEE 4437
Course Title Introduction to Nanotechnology
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite EEE 3105

Detail syllabus: Key nanofabrication techniques, including scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), nanoimprint and soft lithography and MEMS based multi-probe system. Basic building blocks of nanotechnology: introduction to quantum mechanics, 2D, 1D and 0D materials like carbon nanotubes, graphene, semiconductor nanoribbons, quantum dots and applications of these materials.

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. Nanostructures and Nanomaterials – Synthesis, Properties and Applications by Gouzhong Cao
  2. Nanocrystal Quantum Dots, by Victor I Klimov.

 

Communication and Signal Processing Group

Course Code EEE 4441
Course Title Random Signals and Processes
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite STA 2101, EEE 2313

Detailed syllabus: Probability and random variables. Distribution and density functions and Conditional probability. Expectation: moments and characteristics functions. Transformation of a random variable. Vector random variables. Joint distribution and density. Independence. Sums of random variables. Random processes. Correlation functions. Process measurements. Gaussian and Poisson random processes. Noise models. Stationary and Ergodicity. Spectral Estimation. Correlation and power spectrum. Cross spectral densities. Response of linear systems to random inputs. Introduction to discrete time processes, Mean-square error estimation, Detection and linear filtering.

 

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. Introduction to Random Signals and Processes by M. Haag
  2. An Introduction to the Theory of Random Signals and Noise by W. B. Davenport, W. L. Root
  3. Random Signal Processing by D. F. Mix
  4. Introduction to Random Signals and Noise by W. C. Etten
  5. Random Signals and Processes Primer with MATLAB by G. J. Dolecek

 

Course Code EEE 4443
Course Title Information and Coding Theory
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite EEE 3109

Detailed syllabus: Entropy and Mutual Information: Entropy, joint entropy and conditional entropy, Relative entropy and mutual information, chain rules for entropy, relative entropy and mutual information, Jensen’s inequality and log-sum inequality. Differential Entropy: Differential entropy and discrete entropy, joint and conditional differential entropy, properties of differential entropy, relative entropy and mutual information. Entropy Rates of Stochastic Process: Markov Chain, Entropy rate and hidden Markov models. Source Coding: Kraft inequality, optimal codes, Huffman code and its optimality, Shannon-Fano-Elias coding, arithmetic coding. Channel Capacity: Binary symmetric channels and properties of channel capacity, channel coding theorems, joint source and channel coding theorem. Block coding and decoding, BCH, RS codes, Convolutional coding, Viterbi Decoder, Turbo codes, decoding techniques: STBC, SFBC, STFBC. Gaussian Channel: Introduction to Gaussian Channel, Band limited channel, Parallel Gaussian Channel, Gaussian Channel with feedback.

 

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. Information and Coding Theory by G. A. Jones, and J. M. Jones
  2. Introduction to Coding and Information Theory by S. Roman
Course Code EEE 4445
Course Title Microwave Engineering
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite EEE 3313

Detailed syllabus: Introduction to the general characteristics of wave propagation. Physical interpretation of Maxwell’s equations. Propagation of plane electromagnetic waves and energy. Reflection, diffraction, polarization, poynting vector. Transmission lines. Metallic and dielectrically guided waves including microwave waveguides. Antenna fundamentals. Microwaves generators. Microwave tubes: Klystron amplifiers, reflex Klystron oscillators, magnetrons, backward–wave oscillators. Microwave solid-state devices, varactor diodes, Gunn diodes, IMPATT diodes, P-I-n diodes, and their applications. Microwave components: Waveguides, directional coupler, isolators, waveguide couplers, circulators, slotted waveguide.

 

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. Electrical Communication: D. Raddy and J. Coolen
  2. Networks, Lines and Fields: J. D. Ryder
  3. Theory and Application for Microwaves: A. B. Bronwell
  4. Microwave Principles: H. J. Reich
  5. Microwave Devices and Circuits: Y. Liao

 

Course Code EEE 4446
Course Title Microwave Engineering Lab
Credit Hours 1.00

Detailed syllabus: This course consists of two parts. In the first part, students will perform experiments to verify practically the theories and concepts learned in EEE 445. In the second part, students will design simple systems using the principles learned in EEE 445.

 

Course Code EEE 4447
Course Title Digital Communication
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite EEE 3109

Detailed syllabus: Introduction: Communication channels, mathematical model and characteristics. Review of probability and stochastic processes. Source coding: Mathematical models of information, entropy, Huffman and linear predictive coding. Digital transmission system: Baseband digital transmission, inter-symbol interference, bandwidth, power efficiency, modulation and coding trade-off. Receiver for AWGN channels: Correlation demodulator, matched filter demodulator and maximum likelihood receiver. Channel capacity and coding: Channel models and capacities and random selection of codes, convolution codes and coded modulation. Spread spectrum signals and systems.

 

Recommended Books:

  1. Digital Communications by I. Glover and P. Grant
  2. Computer Networking by J. F. Kuross and K. W. Ross
  3. Data and Computer Communication by W. Stallings
  4. Computer Networks by A. S. Tanenbaum

 

Course Code EEE 4448
Course Title Digital Communication Lab
Credit Hours 1.00

Detailed syllabus: This course consists of two parts. In the first part, students will perform experiments to verify practically the theories and concepts learned in EEE 447. In the second part, students will design simple systems using the principles learned in EEE 447.

Course Code EEE 4449
Course Title Optical Fiber Communication
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite EEE 3109

Detailed syllabus: Introduction: Introduction to optical fiber communication systems. Elements of optical fiber communication links, advantages over microwave systems. Propagation of light over optical fibers: Transmission characteristics of optical fibers, optical fiber construction, mechanisms of attenuation and dispersion. Optical cables, optical connector, splice and couplers. Optical sources: Light emitting diodes and laser diodes, and their characteristics. Intensity modulation, direct detection, coherent systems. Optical transmitters and amplifiers. Optical detectors and receivers: PIN photodiodes and avalanche photodiodes, their characteristics. Optical waveguides and optical soliton. Optical link design: Limitations in bandwidth and distance due to attenuation and dispersion. Link budget calculations. Applications: Selection of components for different applications. State-of-the-art applications of optical fiber communications. Analog and digital communication systems. Low BW and bitrate to ultra-wide band and ultra-high bitrate communication systems. Introduction to communication networks (LANs, MANs and WANs).

 

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. Optical Fiber Telecommunication by S. E. Miller and A. G. Chynoweth
  2. Fundamentals of Optical Fiber Communication by M. Barnoski
  3. An Introduction to Fiber Optics by A Ghatak and K Thayagarajan
  4. Optical Fiber Communications by J. M. Senior

 

Course Code EEE 4450
Course Title Optical Fiber Communication Lab
Credit Hours 1.00

Detailed syllabus: This course consists of two parts. In the first part, students will perform experiments to verify practically the theories and concepts learned in EEE 449. In the second part, students will design simple systems using the principles learned in EEE 449.

 

Course Code EEE 4451
Course Title Wireless and Cellular Communication
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite EEE 3109

Detailed syllabus: Introduction: Concept, evolution and fundamentals. Analog and digital cellular systems. Cellular radio system: Frequency reuse, co-channel interference, cell splitting and components. Mobile radio propagation: Propagation characteristics, models for radio propagation, antenna at cell site and mobile antenna. Frequency management and channel assignment: Fundamentals of spectrum utilization, channel assignment, fixed channel assignment, non-fixed channel assignment, traffic and channel assignment. Handoffs and dropped calls: Reasons and types, forced handoffs, mobile assisted handoffs and dropped call rate. Diversity techniques: Concept of diversity branch and signal paths, carrier to noise and carrier to interference ratio performance. Digital cellular systems: Global system for mobile, time division multiple access and code division multiple access.

Recommended Books:

  1. Wireless Communications by T. S. Rappaport
  2. Cellular Communication by W. C. Y. Lee
  3. Mobile Communication by J Schiller, A. Voisard
Course Code EEE 4452
Course Title Wireless and Cellular Communication
Credit Hours 1.00

Detailed syllabus: This course consists of two parts. In the first part, students will perform experiments to verify practically the theories and concepts learned in EEE 451. In the second part, students will design simple systems using the principles learned in EEE 451.

 

Course Code EEE 4453
Course Title Radar and Satellite Communication
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite EEE 3109

Detailed syllabus: Radar engineering: Basic principles, radar equations, factors influencing maximum range, power and frequencies used in radar. Radar cross section, information contents in radar signals, noise and clutter, radar detectors. Types of radar: Basic pulsed radar system, bandwidth requirements, factors governing pulsed characteristics, duplexer, moving target indicator. Doppler and MTI radars, pulse compression, CW and FM-CW radar, radar transmitter and receivers, introduction to polarimetric radar and synthetic aperture radar. Tracking systems and search systems of radar. Radar antennas: Parabolic, lenses, cosecant squared antenna. Introduction to satellite communication. Satellite frequency bands, satellite orbits, satellite types, regulation of the spectrum and interference, propagation channel, air interfaces, link budget analysis, digital modulation, error correction codes, multiple access, receiver synchronization, baseband processing, fixed and mobile applications, basics of satellite networking.

 

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. Satellite Communications by D. Roddy
  2. System Architectures of Satellite Communication, Radar, Navigation and Remote Sensing by W. A. Imbriale, S. Gao, L. Boccia
  3. Satellite Communications by A. K. Maini, V. Agrawal
  4. Introduction to Radar Systems by M. Skolnik
  5. Radar Engineering and Fundamentals of Navigational Aids by G. S. N. Raju

 

Course Code EEE 4455
Course Title Digital Image Processing
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite EEE 3103

Detailed syllabus: History and background of digital image processing, image processing system and applications, visual perception, sensors for image acquisition, sampling and quantization, intensity transformation and enhancement of images in spatial domain, histogram equalization, Fuzzy techniques for image processing, 2D discrete Fourier transform, image restoration, Wiener and constraint least-square filters for images, homomorphic filters, image reconstruction from projections, multi-resolution image processing, sub-band coding and image compression.

 

Recommended Books:

  • Digital Image Processing: R. C. Gonzalez and R. Woods

 

Power Group

 

Course Code EEE 4461
Course Title Power System II
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite EEE 3207

Detail syllabus: Transmission line cables: overhead and underground. Stability. Swing equation, power angle equation, equal area criterion, multi-machine system, step-by-step solution of swing equation. Factors affecting voltage and frequency stability. Economic operation within and among plants, transmission-loss equation, dispatch with losses. Flexible AC transmission system (FACTS). Relative power compensation, compensation techniques. High voltage DC transmission system. Power quality – voltage sag and swell, surges, harmonics, flicker, grounding problems; IEEE/IEC standards, mitigation techniques.

 

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. Power System Engineering by D. P. Kothari and I. J. Nagrath
  2. Switchgear and Protection by S. S. Rao
  3. Power System Analysis by Grainger, Stevenson, Jr.

 

Course Code EEE 4463
Course Title Electrical Machines III
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite EEE 2309

Detail syllabus: Special machine: Series universal motor, permanent magnet DC motor, unipolar and bipolar brush less DC motors, stepper motor and control circuits. Reluctance and hysteresis motors with drive circuits, switched reluctance motor, electrostatic motor, repulsion motor, synchronous and control transformers. Permanent magnet synchronous motors. Acyclic machines: Generators, conduction pump and induction pump. Magnet hydrodynamic generators. Thermoelectric generators, flywheels. Vector control, linear motors and traction. Induction generator, AC-DC-AC conversion.

 

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. “Electric Machinery Fundamentals” 4th edition – by Stephen J. Chapman
  2. “Electric Machines” by C. I. Hubert

 

 

Course Code EEE 4465
Course Title Power Plant Engineering
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite EEE 3207

Detailed syllabus: Power plants: general layout and principles, steam turbine, gas turbine, combined cycle gas turbine, hydro and nuclear. Power plant instrumentation. Selection of location: technical, economic and environmental factors. Load forecasting. Load curve: demand factor, diversity factor, load duration curve, energy load curve, load factor, capacity factor, and utilization factor. Generation scheduling: deterministic and probabilistic. Electricity tariff: formulation and types.

 

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. Principles of Power Systems by V. K. Mehta, R. Mehta
  2. Power Station Engineering and Economy by B. G. A. Skrotzki, W. A. Vopat

 

Course Code EEE 4467
Course Title Power System Protection
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite EEE 3207

Detailed syllabus: Purpose of power system protection. Criteria of detecting faults: overcurrent, differential current, difference of phase angles, over and under voltages, power direction, symmetrical component of current and voltages, impedance, frequency and temperature. Instrument transformers: CT and PT. Electromechanical, electronic and digital relays: basic modules, overcurrent, differential, distance and directional. Trip circuits. Unit protection schemes: generator, transformer, motor, bus bar, transmission and distribution lines. Miniature circuits breakers and fuses. Circuit breakers: principle of arc extinction, selection criteria and ratings of circuit breakers, types, oil, SF6 and vacuum.

Recommended Textbooks

  1. Principles of Power Systems by V. K. Mehta, R. Mehta
  2. Protective Relaying – Principles and Applications by J. L. Blackburn
  3. Switchgear and Protection by S. S. Rao

 

Course Code EEE 4468
Course Title Power System Protection Lab
Credit Hours 1.00

 

Detailed syllabus: This course consists of two parts. In the first part, students will perform experiments to verify practically the theories and concepts learned in EEE 467. In the second part, students will design simple systems using the principles learned in EEE 467.

 

Course Code EEE 4469
Course Title Power System Reliability
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite STA 2101, EEE 3207

Detailed syllabus: Review of probability concepts. Probability distribution: Binomial, Poisson and Normal. Reliability concepts: Failure rate, outage, mean time to failure, series and parallel systems and redundancy. Markov process. Probabilistic generation and load models. Reliability indices: Loss of load probability and loss of energy probability. Frequency and duration. Reliability evaluation techniques of single area system. Interconnected system: tie line and evaluation of reliability indices.

 

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. Reliability Evaluation of Engineering Systems – Concepts and techniques by R. Billinton, R. N. Allan
  2. Reliability Evaluation of Power Systems by R. Billinton, R. N. Allan

 

Course Code EEE 4471
Course Title Power System Operation and Control
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite EEE 3207

Detailed syllabus: Overview: Integrated and deregulated power system. Real-time operation: SCADA. Energy management system, various data acquisition devices, wide area monitoring, protection and control. Application functions: state estimation; short term load forecasting; unit commitment, economic dispatch, optimal power flow. Frequency control: Generation and turbine governors, droop, frequency sensitivity of loads, area control error, automatic generation control and coordination, frequency collapse and emergency load shed. Power system security: Static and dynamic security constraints. Electricity market operation, bidding, spot market, social welfare, market clearing price, locational marginal price, bilateral contracts and forward market, hedging. Demand side control: Distribution and demand side management system, smart grid concept.

 

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. Power System Stability and Control by L. L. Grigsby
  2. Power Generation Operation and Control by A. J. Wood, B. F. Wollenberg
  3. Market Operations in Electric Power Systems – Forecasting, Scheduling and Risk Management by M. Shahidehpour, H. Yamin, Z. Li
  4. SCADA: Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition by S. A. Boyer

 

 

Course Code EEE 4473
Course Title High Voltage Engineering
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite EEE 3207

Detailed syllabus: High voltage DC: Rectifier circuits, voltage multipliers, Van-de-Graaf and Electrostatic generators. High voltage AC: Cascaded transformers and Tesla coils. Impulse voltage: Shapes, mathematical analysis, codes and standards, single and multi-stage impulse generators, tripping and control of impulse generators. Breakdown in gas, liquid and solid dielectric materials. Corona. High voltage measurements and testing. Overvoltage phenomenon and insulation coordination. Lightning and switching surges, basic insulation level, surge diverters, surge diverters and arresters.

 

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. High Voltage Engineering by M. S. Naidu and N. Kamaraju
  2. High Voltage Engineering Fundamentals by E. Kuffel, W. S. Zaengel, J. Keffel
  3. Electrical Transients in Power Systems by A. Greenwood

 

Course Code EEE 4474
Course Title High Voltage Engineering Lab
Credit Hours 1.00

Detailed syllabus: The students will perform experiments to verify practically the theories and concepts learned in EEE 467.

 

Course Code EEE 4475
Course Title Control System II
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite EEE 4103

Detailed syllabus: Compensating using pole placement technique. State equations of digital systems with sample and hold, state equation of digital systems, digital simulation and approximation. Solution of discrete state equations: Z-transform, state equation and transfer function, state diagrams, state plane analysis. Stability of digital control systems. Digital simulation and digital redesign. Time domain analysis. Frequency domain analysis. Controllability and observability. Optimal linear digital regular design. Digital state observer. Microprocessor control. H-control, nonlinear control.

 

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. Control Systems Engineering by N. S. Nise
  2. Modern Control Engineering by K. Ogata.

 

Course Code EEE 4476
Course Title Control System II Lab
Credit Hours 1.00

Detailed syllabus: The students will perform experiments to verify practically the theories and concepts learned in EEE 475. Students will also design simple systems using the principles learned in EEE 475.

 

 

 

Course Code EEE 4477
Course Title Renewable Energy Technology
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite EEE 1301, EEE 2309

Detailed syllabus: Renewable energy sources: Solar, wind, mini-hydro, geothermal, biomass, wave and tides. Solar photovoltaic: Characteristics of photovoltaic (PV) systems, PV models and equivalent circuits, sun tracking systems. Maximum power point tracking: chopper, inverter. Sizing the PV panel and battery pack in stand-alone PV applications. Solar energy applications In residential, electric vehicle, naval, and space. Solar power plants connected to grid. Solar thermal: principles of concentration, solar tower, parabolic dish, receiver, storage, steam turbine and generator. Wind turbines: Turbine types, power limitation, Betz’s law; Control mechanism: Pitch, yaw, speed. Couplings between turbine and electric generator. Wind turbine generator – DC, synchronous, self-excited induction generator and doubly fed induction generator. Grid interconnection: Active and reactive power control. Biomass and biogas electricity generation.

 

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. Solar Engineering of Thermal Process by J. A. Duffiee, W. A. Beckman
  2. Renewable Energy – Power for a Sustainable Future by G. Boyle
  3. Renewable Energy and Climate Change by Volker Quaschning
  4. Solar Photovoltaics- Fundamentals, Technologies and Applications by Chetan Singh Solanki
  5. Renewable Energy sources and emerging technologies by D. P. Kothari, K. C. Singal, Rakesh Ranjan

 

Course Code EEE 4478
Course Title Basic Mechanical Engineering
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite None

Detailed syllabus: Fundamental concepts of Energy, energy transfer, laws of thermodynamics, Thermodynamics cycles: Ideal cycles, Otto cycle, diesel cycle, Brayton cycle, Vapor power cycle. Steam generators, Refrigeration and air-conditioning systems, compressor, pump. IC engines, Gas turbine and Jet engines, steam turbine, water turbine. Heat transfer mechanism, Basic modes of heat transfer, Laws of radiation heat transfer, Natural convection heat transfer, Analogy between heat and mass transfer. Machine elements: Gears, bearings, spring.

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. “Basic mechanical Engineering” by Pravin Kumar

 

  1. “Fundamentals of Thermodynamics” by Claus Borgnakke and Richard E. Sonntag

 

 

 

Computer Group

 

Course Code EEE 4479
Course Title Data Structure and Algorithm
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite CSE 1203

Detail syllabus: Abstract data types and structures, classes and objects. Arrays, linked lists, stacks, queues, trees and graphs; basic data structures operations: traversal, insertion, deletion, searching, merging, sorting, tree; Introduction, Growth of Functions, Techniques for analysis of algorithms; Methods for the design of efficient algorithms: divide and conquer, greedy method, dynamic programming, back tracking, branch and bound; basic search and traversal techniques; topological sorting; connected components, spanning trees, shortest paths; Flow algorithms; Approximation algorithms; Parallel algorithms, Lower bound theory; NP-completeness, NP-hard and NP-complete problems.

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. Introduction to Algorithms by Thomas H. CormenCharles E. Leiserson , Ronald L. Rivest and Clifford Stein, 3rd Edition
  2. Algorithm Design by Kleinberg Jon, 1st Edition
  3. Schaum’s Outline of Theory and Problems of Data Structures, Latest Edition, Seymour Lipchutz.
  4. Mark Allen Weiss, Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis in C++, Third Edition, Addison Wesley.

 

 

Course Code EEE 4480
Course Title Data Structure and Algorithm lab
Credit Hours 1.00

Detailed syllabus: In this course students will perform experiments to verify practically the theories and concepts learned in EEE 479.

 

Course Code EEE 4481
Course Title Artificial Intelligence
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite EEE 4479

Detail syllabus: Artificial Intelligence and Intelligent Agents, Problem Solving (Solving Problems by Searching, Adversarial Search, Constraint Satisfaction Problems), Knowledge and Reasoning (Logical Agents, First-Order Logic, Inference in First-Order Logic, Classical Planning, Planning and Acting in the Real World, Knowledge Representation), Uncertain Knowledge and Reasoning (Quantifying Uncertainty, Probabilistic Reasoning, Probabilistic Reasoning over Time, Making Simple Decisions, Making Complex Decisions), Learning (Learning from Examples, Knowledge in Learning, Learning, Probabilistic Models, Reinforcement Learning).

Introduction to machine learning; Regression analysis: Logistic regression, linear regression; Classification techniques: Supervised and unsupervised classification; Neural networks; Support vector machines; Classification trees; Rule based learning; Instance based learning; Reinforcement learning; Ensemble learning; Negative correlation learning; Evolutionary algorithms; Genetic algorithm, Statistical performance evaluation techniques of learning algorithms: bias-variance tradeoff; Practical applications of machine learning recent applications of machine learning, such as to robotic control, data mining, autonomous navigation, bioinformatics, speech recognition, and text and web data processing.

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. Artificial Intelligence – A Modern Approach, Prentice-Hall, 2003 by Stuart J. Russel and Peter Norvig.
  2. Introduction to Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems, Prentice-Hall, 2003 by Dan W. Patterson.
  3. Pattern Recognition and Machine Learning by Christopher Bishop

 

 

Course Code EEE 4483
Course Title Internet of Things
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite EEE 3311

 

Detail syllabus: Introduction to Internet in general and Internet of Things: layers, protocols, packets, services, performance parameters of a packet network as well as applications such as web, Peer-to-peer, sensor networks, and multimedia. Transport services: TCP, UDP, socket programming; Network layer: forwarding & routing algorithms (Link, DV), IP-addresses, DNS, NAT, and routers; Local Area Networks, MAC level, link protocols such as: point-to-point protocols, Ethernet, WiFi 802.11, cellular Internet access, and Machine-to-machine; Mobile Networking: roaming and handoffs, mobile IP, and ad hoc and infrastructure less networks; Real-time networking: soft and real time, quality of service/information, resource reservation and scheduling, and performance measurements; IoT definitions: overview, applications, potential & challenges, and architecture; IoT examples: Case studies, e.g. sensor body-area-network and control of a smart home.

 

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. IoT Fundamentals: Networking Technologies, Protocols, and Use Cases for the Internet of Things by D. Hanes, 1st Edition
  2. Internet of Things for Architects: Architecting IoT solutions by implementing sensors, communication infrastructure, edge computing, analytics, and security by P. Lea

 

Course Code EEE 4484
Course Title Internet of Things Lab
Credit Hours 1.00

Detail syllabus: In this course students will perform experiments to verify practically the theories and concepts learned in EEE 483.

 

Course Code EEE 4485
Course Title Numerical Methods 
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite MAT 2101

Detail syllabus: Overview of engineering computation algorithms and methods; issue in engineering computation; solutions to sets of linear equations; solution of over determined equations; polynomial curve fitting; iterative techniques and applications; finite difference techniques and applications; numerical integrations; solution of ordinary differential equations; solution of partial differential equations; random number generation. Different applications of numerical methods.

 

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. Introduction to Ordinary Differential Equations by Shepley L. Ross, 4th Edition
  2. Numerical Analysis by Richard L. Burden, J. Douglas Faires, Annette M. Burden, 10th Edition.

 

Course Code EEE 4486
Course Title Numerical Methods Lab
Credit Hours 1.00

Detail syllabus: In this course students will perform experiments to verify practically the theories and concepts learned in EEE 485.

 

Course Code EEE 4487
Course Title Computer Architecture 
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite EEE 3311

Detail syllabus: Information representation; Measuring performance; Instructions and data access methods: operations and operands of computer hardware, representing instruction, addressing styles; Arithmetic Logic Unit (ALU) operations, floating point operations, designing ALU; Processor design: data paths – single cycle and multicycle implementations; Control Unit design – hardwired and microprogrammed; Hazards; Exceptions; Pipeline: pipelined data path and control, superscalar and dynamic pipelining; Memory organization: cache, virtual memory, channels; Concepts of DMA and Interrupts; Buses: overview of computer BUS standards; Multiprocessors: types of multiprocessors, performance, single bus multiprocessors, multiprocessors connected by network, clusters.

 

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. Computer System Architecture by M. Morris Mano.
  2. Computer Architecture, Fifth Edition: A Quantitative Approach

 

 

Course Code EEE 4489
Course Title Cloud Computing 
Credit Hours

Pre-requisite

3.00

CSE 1203

Detail syllabus: Cloud Computing has transformed the IT industry by opening the possibility for infinite or at least highly elastic scalability in the delivery of enterprise applications and software as a service (SaaS). Amazon Elastic Cloud, Microsoft’s Azure, Google App Engine, and many other Cloud offerings give mature software vendors and new start-ups the option to deploy their applications to systems of infinite computational power with practically no initial capital investment and with modest operating costs proportional to the actual use. The course examines the most important APIs used in the Amazon and Microsoft Cloud, including the techniques for building, deploying, and maintaining machine images and applications. We will learn how to use Cloud as the infrastructure for existing and new services. We will use open source implementations of highly available clustering computational environments, as well as RESTful Web services, to build very powerful and efficient applications. We also learn how to deal with not trivial issues in the Cloud, such as load balancing, caching, distributed transactions, and identity and authorization management

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. Cloud Computing: Methodology, Systems, and Applications by Lizhe Wang, Rajiv Ranjan, Jinjun Chen, Boualem Benatallah, 1st Edition
  2. Cloud Computing: A Practical Approach by Robert C. Elsenpeter, Toby Velte, Anthony Velte, 1st Edition

 

Course Code EEE 4491
Course Title Multimedia Communication
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite EEE 3207

Detail syllabus: Types of media. Multimedia signal characteristic: sampling, digital representation, signal formats. Signal coding and compression: entropy coding, transform coding, vector quantization. Coding standards: H.26x, LPEG, MPEG. Multimedia communication networks: network topologies and layers, LAN, MAN, WAN, PSTN, ISDN, ATM, internetworking devices, the internet and access technologies, enterprise networks, wireless LANs and wireless multimedia. Entertainment networks: cable, satellite and terrestrial TV networks, ADSL and VDSL, high speed modems. Transport protocols: TCP, UDP, IP, Ipv4, Ipv6, FTP, RTP and RTCP, use of MPLS and WDMA. Multimedia synchronization, security, QoS and resource management. Multimedia applications: The www, internet telephony, teleconferencing, HDTV, email and ecommerce.

 

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. Multimedia Communications: Applications, Networks, Protocols and Standards by Fred Halsall
  2. Multimedia Communications and Networking by Mario Marques da Silva
  3. Wireless Multimedia Communication Systems – Design, Analysis, and Implementation by K. R. Rao, Zoran S. Bojkovic, Bozan M Bakmaz
  4. Introduction to Multimedia Communications Applications by Kamisetty Rao, Zoran Bojkovic.

 

Course Code EEE 4492
Course Title Network Programming
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite CSE 3209

Detail syllabus: Introduction to networking and internet protocols, Complete coverage of the Java networking and I/O APIs, Details of multithreading and exception handling, Byte, Character, Object and Message streams, IP, TCP, UDP, Multicast, HTTP, DNS, RMI, CORBA and Servlets, Fingers, DNS, HTTP, and ping, Clients and Servers, Multiprotocol chat systems and whiteboards.

 

Course Code EEE 4493
Course Title Neural Networks and Applications
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite EEE 3103

Detail syllabus: Neurons and neural networks, basic models of artificial neural networks: simple layer perception, feed forward multilayer perceptron, Hopfield networks, competitive learning networks, applications of neural networks for matrix algebra problems, adaptive filtering and adaptive pattern recognition, dynamic system identification, dynamic system modeling using recurrent neural networks, approximation/optimization problems, VLSI implementation of neural networks.

 

Course Code EEE 4495
Course Title Object Oriented Programming
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite CSE 1203

Detail syllabus: Object-Oriented Fundamentals, Encapsulation, Polymorphism, Inheritance, Class, Object, Java Language Introduction, Variable Types and operators, Casting, Arrays, Introducing classes, Adding methods to class, constructor, String Handling, Garbage collection, Inheritance, Inner Class, Abstract Classes, Interfaces and Packages, Exception Handling, Java Input / Output, Multithreaded Programming and Synchronization, Applet, Event Handling, Networking with Java, Introducing the Swing, Utility Classes, Java Generics.

 

Course Code EEE 4490
Course Title Big Data Analytics
Credit Hours 3.00
Pre-requisite CSE 1203

Detail syllabus: This course provides a basic introduction to big data and corresponding quantitative research methods. The objective of the course is to familiarize students with big data analysis as a tool for addressing substantive research questions. The course begins with a basic introduction to big data and discusses what the analysis of these data entails, as well as associated technical, conceptual and ethical challenges. Strength and limitations of big data research are discussed in depth using real-world examples. Students then engage in case study exercises in which small groups of students develop and present a big data concept for a specific real-world case. This includes practical exercises to familiarize students with the format of big data. It also provides a first hands-on experience in handling and analyzing large, complex data structures. The block course is designed as a primer for anyone interested in attaining a basic understanding of what big data analysis entails. There are no prerequisite requirements for this course.

 

Recommended Textbooks:

  1. Data Science & Big Data Analytics: Discovering, Analyzing, Visualizing and Presenting Data by D Dietrich, 1st Edition
  2. Big Data Analytics by Venkat Ankam

The Universityof Liberal Arts Bangladesh and its curricula are accredited by the University Grants Commission (UGC) of Bangladesh, and approved by the Ministry of Education, Government of People's Republic of Bangladesh.